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I am looking for some advice on designing a class hierarchy for game objects. For this discussion I will mainly talk about two specific classes. An Object and Sprite.

The Object is the base class for any type of object in the game. Sprite inherits directly from Object, but some of Object's public methods no longer make sense. Here is some code to explain:

class Object {
public:
    Object() : renderer(NULL), controller(NULL), collider(NULL) { }
    virtual ~Object();

    Renderer *getRenderer() const;
    Controller *getController() const;
    Collider *getCollider() const;

    void setRenderer(Renderer *renderer);
    void setController(Controller *controller);
    void setCollider(Collider *collider);
private:
    Renderer *renderer;
    Controller *controller;
    Collider *collider;
};

Object has three components a renderer, collider, and a controller. Sprite of course has these three components, but uses a SpriteRenderer. I figured then I would not want the setRenderer method exposed for the sprite class.

So I thought that I should write the sprite class as follows:

class Sprite : protected Object {
public:
    Sprite(Texture *texture) : Object(), texture(texture) {
        setRenderer(new SpriteRenderer(this));
    }

    Renderer *getRenderer() const;
    Controller *getController() const;
    Collider *getCollider() const;

    void setController(Controller *controller);
    void setCollider(Collider *collider);
private:
    Texture *texture;
};

where the getters and setters just call the relevant Object method. But in this case, I can not really use the Sprite as an Object, e.g. pass it to a function which takes Objects.

My other implementation is:

class Sprite : public Object {
public:
    Sprite(Texture *texture) : Object(), texture(texture) {
        setRenderer(new SpriteRenderer(this));
    }
private:
    Texture *texture;
};

which exposes the setRenderer method.

My thought process is that the setRenderer method should not be exposed because a Sprite is an Object with a SpriteRenderer, so if it is changed, then it is not a Sprite. However, I do not see an obvious way to prevent it from changing.

In general is this something I should just not worry about, or is there another way to go about this design?

share|improve this question
1  
Why not separate features on concrete objects and then use multiple inheritance? For example: RenderableObjects with all the stuff needed to render, PhysicsObjects containing all you need for Physics, AliveObjects for all the objects that are alive. Then if you need a invisible wall you can create an object ONLY RenderableObject, the objects visible and collidables inherits from RenderableObject and PhysicsObject, if you need a destructible object make it inherit from RenderableObject, PhysicsObject and AliveObject. – PaperBirdMaster Aug 16 '12 at 6:10
1  
I agree with @PaperBirdMaster. C++ allows for multiple inheritance, why not use it? Also for the problem of not exposing setRenderer in SpriteObject, you could do normal public inheritance, but make setRenderer (with the same signature) a private method in SpriteObject. This will override the setRenderer in Object. – Joachim Pileborg Aug 16 '12 at 6:38
2  
@JoachimPileborg: Or in the derived class do private: using Object::setRenderer;. – Xeo Aug 16 '12 at 7:29
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should ask yourself: do you need to change the Renderer (and other components) on runtime? I believe this is not needed AFTER object instance is created. As the consequence I would not put methods setRenderer (and other setXXX) in the public API at all. Do you need to expose these parameters at all? If yes, then I can propose the following:

.

class Object
{
public:
    // Constructor with all the necessary parameters. 
    // For simplicity I keep only Renderer
    Object(const Renderer & renderer) :
        renderer_(renderer)
    {
    }

    const Renderer & getRenderer() const { return renderer_; }

private:
    // I think reference is better if Renderer MUST always be not NULL
    const Renderer & renderer_;

};

This way you have nice immutable class.

For constructing Sprite instances you might need SpriteFactory or SpriteBuilder.

.

class Sprite : public Object
{
public:
    Sprite(const Renderer & renderer, const SpriteSpecificStuff & stuff) :
        Object(renderer),
        ...
    {
    }
};

class SpriteBuilder
{
public:
    void setRenderer(const Renderer * renderer);
    void setSpriteSpecificStuff();

    std::auto_ptr<Sprite> build();
};

Again, using the builder you will have nice immutable class

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Instead of modeling your objects using getters and setters, make the objects actually do what you want -- you won't have to worry about exposing setters when there are none. :)

For example, have the object render itself instead of returning a renderer. That way, a sprite can override this behaviour:

class Object {
    virtual void render() = 0;
}

class Sprite : public Object {
    void render() {
      // use a SpriteRenderer
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
There's one problem with this approach: what happens if there's an object that must not be rendered? The class Object must be the most abstract possible and limited only to functionalities shared with all objects regardless of its type. – PaperBirdMaster Aug 16 '12 at 7:14
    
@PaperBirdMaster: And in reality, that functionality is most likely non-existent. I don't like Object bases. :/ – Xeo Aug 16 '12 at 7:30
1  
I dislike Abstract Object Classes too, but it is the design proposed by the OP ;) so, in the case that a grandfather class is needed, it must accomplish some features. – PaperBirdMaster Aug 16 '12 at 7:37
1  
@Xeo: To be fair, it's not an "object" base the way Java or C# use them. It's more a "GameObject" class that represents a thing in the game world, which is much more reasonable to use. – Nicol Bolas Aug 16 '12 at 12:10
    
@PaperBirdMaster: That's not a problem I introduced. The OP already has a setRenderer in the class, which means those objects are already meant to be rendered. I simply proposed a different way of looking at the problem. – casablanca Aug 17 '12 at 1:31

Going with my comment about multiple inheritance, you could think about objects as some being renderable, some being some being able to collide, some being "controlled" (whatever that means in your system). So instead of having a single base object that contains all those three properties (and more maybe) you could have one base class for each capability.

class Renderable
{
public:
    Renderable(Rendered *renderer) : remderer_(renderer) {}

    Renderer *getRenderer() const;
    void setRenderer(Renderer *renderer);

private:
    Renderer *renderer_;
}

class Controllable
{
public:
    Controllable(Constroller &constroller) : controller_(constroller) {}

    Controller *getController() const;

    void setController(Controller *controller);

private:
    Controller *controller_;
};

class Collidable {
public:
    Collidable(Collider *collider) : collider_(collider) {}

    Collider *getCollider() const;

    void setCollider(Collider *collider);

private:
    Collider *collider_;
};

Then the Sprite class having all three capabilities, you inherit all three:

class Sprite : public Renderable, public Controllable, public Collidable
{
public:
    Sprite()
        : Renderable(new SpriteRenderer)  // Supply special renderer
        {}

private:
    // Disallow users of the `Sprite` class to call this function;
    using Renderable::setRenderer;
};

This system, of having classes for capabilities, works very well when creating "objects" in a game world. Take for example a fantasy-styled game, you have a class Sword that inherits from Weapon, Wearable and Carryable, meaning the sword can be used as a weapon, be worn and can be carried.

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