Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am creating a password reset feature for web site. First step for password reset have to be implemented:

  1. User enters his email in password reset form.
  2. System checks if user with email is registered.
  3. If user has been found, system sends email with password reset URL with uniqe token.
  4. If user is not found, system sends email notifying that password reset was initiated for this email, but user account doesn't exist.

I have service class which implements public method - RequestPasswordReset and this method is quite procedural:

public void RequestPasswordReset(string email)
{
    if(!IsValidEmail(email))
    {
        throw new ArgumentException("email");
    }

    var user = this.repository.FindByEmail(email);
    if(user != null)
    {
        user.PasswordResetToken.Set(this.tokenGenerator.NewToken());
        this.emailService.Send(this.from, 
                               user.Email, 
                               "Password reset", 
                               "Your reset url: http://mysite.com/?t=" + 
                                     user.PasswordResetToken.Value);
    }
    else
    {
    this.emailService.Send(this.from,
                        user.Email, 
                        "Requested password reset", 
                        "Someone requested password reset at http://mysite.com");
    }
}

This method violates Single Responsibility Principle - it checks user existence, resets user token, sends emails.

The main issue with such solution is that if I need to add additional steps I have to add implementation for those to RequestPasswordReset method and method becomes more and more complex. Additional steps could be, for example, to check if user is registered in another related system already and I could advise him create new account in my system or create user account for him.

I was looking at Command pattern - it might be good to refactor service class into separate commands and RequestPasswordReset could be one of those commands. But it doesn't solve main issue with steps inside RequestPasswordReset method.

I was also looking at Chain of Responsibility pattern - it would be good to handle steps in order, but I do not know how it could be used to handle control flow - different conditions which should be implemented. Also it looks like that each handler should do similar actions and it will be not clear how the whole control flow changes.

What would be best approach to refactor such procedural code?

share|improve this question
1  
Your approach to patterns seems almost backwards. Examine patterns to find solutions to the problems you have. Don't try and fit your solutions (badly?) to patterns just because they are there. Refactoring is needed when there is something wrong with the way the code has been written. As some of the answers indicate, there does not appear to be anything wrong with your approach. –  Chris Walton Aug 16 '12 at 8:05
    
Example in question is quite simple, but I know that I will have to add search for user in external system and if found create new user and send email to reset password for newly created user. What to do if I would need more steps to achieve? –  marisks Aug 16 '12 at 8:15
    
Refactor when you need to. And not before. –  John Saunders Aug 16 '12 at 12:11
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think your code is fine as it is. If you absolutely want to refactor something, you might split the code up a little more just to simplify readability of the main method; something like this:

public void RequestPasswordReset(string email)
{
    ValidateEmail(email); // May throw exception if invalid

    var user = this.repository.FindByEmail(email);
    if(user != null)
    {
        GenerateTokenAndSendPasswordResetEmail(user);
    }
    else
    {
        SendPasswordResetEmail(email);
    }
}

Other than that, I would leave it as it is. Your problem is really quite simple, so there is no reason to look for a complex solution! :)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I did something like this. Example was simplified version from my real code, so I did also other refactor actions. –  marisks Aug 29 '12 at 16:48
add comment

This method violates Single Responsibility Principle

Actually I don't think it does. The "single responsibility" of the service is to reset a user's password, and it does this quite well by coordinating with other objects (user repository and mail service). If the process of resetting a password changes, then this class will change and there is nothing wrong about that.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Robert C Martin defines a responsibility as 'a reason to change'. As far as I can see the class, while doing a couple of related things, still only has one reason to change. –  MattDavey Aug 16 '12 at 7:18
add comment

The best thing to do with this code is to ensure that it is thoroughly tested. Ensure that all code paths have been tested.

And then, get over it!

Get over the idea that all code has to abide by design patterns, single responsibility principle and other such stuff. Those patterns were discovered by examining working code.

You've got working code here. Get over it and get onto the next task.

share|improve this answer
    
"Thoroughly tested" code is not necessarily well-designed or easy to maintain. I've seen cases where the tests are just as difficult to understand as the code itself. Putting just a little thought into design goes a long way in improving maintainability of the codebase. –  casablanca Aug 16 '12 at 7:25
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.