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what is this the correct way to pass 2 dimensional array of unknown size?

reprVectorsTree::reprVectorsTree(float tree[][], int noOfVectors, int dimensions)

how to access the elements of this array later in the function?

How to pass a 2 dimensional array from the calling function?

-----edit----

I want to do with an array as the calling is done from a c code and there is a c to c++ interface

-----edit----- How to define pass a 2 dimensional array from the calling function?

float tree[15][2] = {{2,1},{2,1},{2,1},{2,1},{2,1},{2,1},{2,1},{2,1},{2,1},{2,1},{2,1},{2,1},{2,1},{2,1},{2,1}};

reprVectorsTree *r1 = new reprVectorsTree(tree[0][0],8,2);

what is wrong with the above code? I get a cannot convert parameter 1 from 'float' to 'float **'

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1  
This is C++. Use a vector. –  chris Aug 16 '12 at 6:50
    
please check the edit –  user494461 Aug 16 '12 at 6:52
    
Well then you'll just have to use a float ** –  chris Aug 16 '12 at 6:54
    
You should change your tag from 'C++' to 'C' –  Graeme Aug 16 '12 at 7:12

5 Answers 5

Use pointers..

     reprVectorsTree(tree, noOfVectors, dimensions);// Calling function.

Function Definition:

reprVectorsTree(float **tree, int noOfVectors, int dimensions){


}

I think it will be helpful to you.

share|improve this answer
    
Please note, that tree should be declared as array of pointers and not a static 2D array of floats. Otherwise the code won't compile. –  Maksim Skurydzin Aug 16 '12 at 7:16
    
Yes. You are right. I thought he(Who asked question) knew this declaration. –  Prasad G Aug 16 '12 at 7:20
    
please check the edit –  user494461 Aug 16 '12 at 7:23
    
@user494461: You have just passed the value in reprVectorsTree function. Here you have to pass the array Or you have to change function definition. –  Prasad G Aug 16 '12 at 7:33
    
no this doesn't work at all, float** and float[][] are very different kinds of animals. –  Jens Gustedt Aug 16 '12 at 7:42

If the size is unknown, you can use a simple float *tree pointer to a 1D array. The syntax for turning to particular elements wouldn't be as of 2D arrays however:

reprVectorsTree::reprVectorsTree(float *tree, int noOfVectors, int dimensions)
{
    ...
    tree[ row_number * dimensions + column_number ] = 100.234;
}

In the calling code you will have something like this:

float d2array[ROWS][COLUMNS];
...
reprVectorsTree(&d2array[0][0], ROWS, COLUMNS);

updated

Consider the following example of different approaches of passing a 2D array:

#include <iostream>
#include <malloc.h>

float test[2][4] = 
{
   {3.0, 4.0, 5.0, 0},
   {6.0, 7.0, 8.0, 0}
};

void print(float *root, int rows, int columns)
{
   for (int row = 0; row < rows; ++row)
   {
      for (int col = 0; col < columns; ++col)
      {
         std::cout << root[row * columns + col ] << " ";
      }
      std::cout << std::endl;
   }
}

float *test2[2] = 
{
   &test[0][0],
   &test[1][0],
};

void print2(float **root, int rows, int columns)
{
   for (int row = 0; row < rows; ++row)
   {
      for (int col = 0; col < columns; ++col)
      {
         std::cout << root[row][col] << " ";
      }
      std::cout << std::endl;
   }
}

int main()
{
   print(&test[0][0], 2, 4);
   //print(test2, 2, 4); // doesn't work

   print2(test2, 2, 4);
   //print2(&test[0][0], 2, 4); // doesn't work
   //print2(&test[0], 2, 4); // doesn't work

   float **dynamic_array = (float **)malloc(2 * sizeof(float *));
   dynamic_array[0] = (float *)malloc(4 * sizeof(float));
   dynamic_array[1] = (float *)malloc(4 * sizeof(float));

   for (int row = 0; row < 2; ++row)
   {
      for (int col = 0; col < 4; ++col)
      {
         dynamic_array[row][col] = (float)(row * 4 + col);
      }
   }

   print2(dynamic_array, 2, 4);
   //print(dynamic_array, 2, 4); // doesn't work

   return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
reprVectorsTree(&d2array[0][0], ROWS, COLUMNS); - I get cannot convert from float to float** –  user494461 Aug 16 '12 at 7:16
    
you need you root to be described as float * for this approach to work. –  Maksim Skurydzin Aug 16 '12 at 7:28
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int
main(void)
{
    int layers = 3; // can be calculated in run-time
    int elem = 5; // can be calculated in run-time
    int* pArray = new int[layers * elem];
    /* usage */
    for (int i = 0; i < sizeof(pArray) / sizeof(pArray[0]); ++i) // traverse through layers
    {

        for (int j = 0; j < sizeof(pArray[0])/ sizeof(int); ++j) // traverse through elements in layer
        {
            // do some stuff
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

In modern C, starting from C99, it is a simple as that

void foo(size_t n, size_t m, double A[n][m]) {
  //
}

and here you go. The only thing that you'd have to have in mind is that the sizes must come before the array in the argument list.

To avoid to allocate such a beast on the stack on the calling side you should just do

double (*A)[m] = malloc(sizeof(double[n][m]));

such a "matrix" can be used as you are used to with something like A[i][j] and a call to foo would just look like

foo(n, m, A);
share|improve this answer
    
I get an error - expected constant expression of I do this way –  user494461 Aug 16 '12 at 10:05
    
Then you don't have a compiler that is complying to C99. The only one that is still around that isn't and that is largely used is MS, is it? –  Jens Gustedt Aug 16 '12 at 11:20

First idea was to use vectors. But if you are working with a C code, pass it as a reprVectorsTree(float** tree, int noOfVectors, int dimensions).

For your case:

float tree[15][2] = {{2,1},{2,1},{2,1},{2,1},{2,1},{2,1},{2,1},{2,1},{2,1},{2,1},{2,1},{2,1},{2,1},{2,1},{2,1}};

int nRows = 15;
int nCols = 2;

float** arr = new float*[nRows];

for (int i = 0; i < nRows; ++i) {
     arr[i] = new float[nCols];
}

for (int i = 0; i < nRows; ++i) {
    for (int j = 0; j < nCols; ++j) {
        arr[i][j] = tree[i][j];
    }
}

reprVectorsTree *r1 = new reprVectorsTree(arr, nRows, nCols);
share|improve this answer
    
no this doesn't work at all, float** and float[][] are very different kinds of animals. –  Jens Gustedt Aug 16 '12 at 7:41
    
Ok, agree with you! I just thought that he want to pass the 2d array to the function. Will correct my answer. –  besworland Aug 16 '12 at 8:05
    
float** is a pointer to pointer to float. You can't call your version of reprVectorsTree with a matrix that is declared as float[n][m] they have completely different memory layout. –  Jens Gustedt Aug 16 '12 at 8:09
    
Yes-yes. The question was misunderstood. –  besworland Aug 16 '12 at 8:16

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