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Please check the following example:

http://www.esaer.com.br/csstest/

If the vertical scrollbar doesn't appear, please resize the window so it does. Problem is: when you scroll down, the portion of the screen that was hidden does not show the blue div background, which has height 100%, even though the red div forces the height of the 'page' overall be greater than one screen.

I want the blue background to span the entire page, even if the page is bigger than one screen. How can I make that happen? (I've been suggested a javascript solution already, but would prefer a css-only approach)

Thanks in advance!

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5 Answers 5

Does the inner element matter? If not:

* { margin:0; padding:0; }
html, body { height:100%; }
#main-div { min-height:100%; width:400px; margin:0 auto; background:blue; }

<body><div id="main-div">test</div></body>
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In fact, it does matter, since it's what is causing the scroll in the first place... edited the page to reflect a few of your modifications though... –  Rafael Almeida Jul 29 '09 at 5:58
    
If it's flexible enough I'd opt for the background on html element. –  meder Jul 29 '09 at 6:35

100% mean 100% of the viewable area, i.e. the screen size so this is working as designed.

What you might be interested in is position: fixed although iirc older IEs have some issues with this: ref, ref2

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If you use padding in the main div and then use a relative position in the inner div it could probably work, I'm not quite sure if you want this behavior at all, hopefully this could get you a little closer to what you looking for.

#main-div {
    background:blue none repeat scroll 0 0;
    height:100%;
    left:50%;
    margin-left:-200px;
    position:absolute;
    width:400px;
    padding:20;
}
#sub-div {
    background:red none repeat scroll 0 0;
    height:200px;
    left:50px;
    position:relative;
    width:200px;
    float:left;
}
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<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xml:lang="en" lang="en">
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" />
<title>CSS Test</title>
<style type="text/css">
    body {
    	margin: 0px;
    	padding: 0px;
    	overflow-y:hidden;
    	overflow-x:hidden;
    }

    #main-div {
    	width: 400px;
    	height:100%;
    	position: absolute;
    	left: 10%;
    	background: blue;
    }

    #sub-div {
    	width: 200px;
    	height: 200px;
    	position: absolute;
    	left: 50px;
    	top: 400px;
    	background: red;
    }
    #container{
    	position:absolute;
    	width:100%;
    	height:100%;
    	overflow-y:scroll;
    	overflow-x:scroll;
    }
</style>
</head>
<body>
    <div id="main-div"></div>
    <div id="container">
    	<div id="sub-div"></div>
    </div>
</body>
</html>
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Works great. However, this takes the scrollbars out of place, which is undesireable... –  Rafael Almeida Jul 30 '09 at 4:05
    
You're right, the horizontal scroll was screwed up. I fixed it. –  Charlie Jul 30 '09 at 16:10
up vote 0 down vote accepted

"Solved" the issue by forcing a certain height (bigger than the fixed-size element) and living with the limitations.

Thank you for all the answers, though, they might be helpful in some other situations!

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