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How can I iterate over a tuple (using C++11)? I tried the following, but that doesn't work:

for(int i=0; i<std::tuple_size<T...>::value; ++i) 
  std::get<i>(my_tuple).do_sth();

Error 1: sorry, unimplemented: cannot expand ‘Listener ...’ into a fixed-length argument list.
Error 2: i cannot appear in a constant expression.

So, how do I correctly iterate over the elements of a tuple?

share|improve this question
2  
May I ask, how you compile in C++0x? It is not released nor ready as far as I know. – Burkhard Jul 29 '09 at 6:09
5  
g++ contains experimental support of some C++0X features, including variadic templates, since version 4.3. Other compilers do the same (with different feature sets, if you want to use them in production, you are back in the 90 with a wide variation of support for bleeding edge things) – AProgrammer Jul 29 '09 at 7:10
    
What compiler do you use? – Kirill V. Lyadvinsky Jul 29 '09 at 17:48
5  
This question needs a C++11 update. – Omnifarious Feb 3 '13 at 4:04
1  
@Omnifarious now, it needs a C++14 update – pepper_chico Apr 19 '14 at 15:38
up vote 20 down vote accepted

Boost.Fusion is a possibility:

Untested example:

struct DoSomething
{
    template<typename T>
    void operator()(T& t) const
    {
        t.do_sth();
    }
};

tuple<....> t = ...;
boost::fusion::for_each(t, DoSomething());
share|improve this answer
4  
does it work with a std::tuple? – Viktor Sehr Jan 13 '12 at 17:08
    
@ViktorSehr AFAICT it doesn't (at least on GCC 4.7.2)? Anyone with a hint? – sehe Apr 8 '13 at 7:55
    
@ViktorSehr Found the problem: a bug/omission causes the behaviour of fusion to depend on the order of the includes, see Boost ticket #8418 for more details – sehe Apr 8 '13 at 13:10
    
need to use boost::fusion::tuple instead of std::tuple to have this working. – Marcin Jan 25 '15 at 2:08

I have an answer based on Iterating over a Tuple:

#include <tuple>
#include <utility> 
#include <iostream>

template<std::size_t I = 0, typename... Tp>
inline typename std::enable_if<I == sizeof...(Tp), void>::type
  print(std::tuple<Tp...>& t)
  { }

template<std::size_t I = 0, typename... Tp>
inline typename std::enable_if<I < sizeof...(Tp), void>::type
  print(std::tuple<Tp...>& t)
  {
    std::cout << std::get<I>(t) << std::endl;
    print<I + 1, Tp...>(t);
  }

int
main()
{
  typedef std::tuple<int, float, double> T;
  T t = std::make_tuple(2, 3.14159F, 2345.678);

  print(t);
}

The usual idea is to use compile time recursion. In fact, this idea is used to make a printf that is type safe as noted in the original tuple papers.

This can be easily generalized into a for_each for tuples:

#include <tuple>
#include <utility> 

template<std::size_t I = 0, typename FuncT, typename... Tp>
inline typename std::enable_if<I == sizeof...(Tp), void>::type
  for_each(std::tuple<Tp...> &, FuncT) // Unused arguments are given no names.
  { }

template<std::size_t I = 0, typename FuncT, typename... Tp>
inline typename std::enable_if<I < sizeof...(Tp), void>::type
  for_each(std::tuple<Tp...>& t, FuncT f)
  {
    f(std::get<I>(t));
    for_each<I + 1, FuncT, Tp...>(t, f);
  }

Though this then requires some effort to have FuncT represent something with the appropriate overloads for every type the tuple might contain. This works best if you know all the tuple elements will share a common base class or something similar.

share|improve this answer
3  
Thanks for the nice simple example. For C++ beginners looking for background on how this works, see SFINAE and enable_if documentation. – Faheem Mitha Feb 12 '12 at 5:28
    
This could easily be generalized to be a generic for_each. In fact, I did it myself. :-) I think this answer would be more useful if it was already generalized. – Omnifarious Feb 3 '13 at 11:27
3  
There, I added the generalization because I actually needed one, and I think it'd be useful for others to see. – Omnifarious Feb 4 '13 at 7:06
2  
Note: You might also need versions with const std::tuple<Tp...>&.. If you don't intend to modify tuples while iterating, those const versions will suffice. – lethal-guitar Jun 6 '13 at 19:17
1  
Not as written.. You could make a version with the indexing flipped - start at I=sizeof...(Tp) and count down. Then supply a maximum number of args explicitly. You could also make a version that broke on a tag type, say break_t. Then you would put an object of that tag type in your tuple when you wanted to stop printing. Or you could supply a stop type as a template parm. Obviously you couldn't break at run time. – emsr Dec 12 '14 at 19:29

Use Boost.Fusion and generic lambdas:

#include <tuple>
#include <iostream>
#include <boost/fusion/adapted/std_tuple.hpp>
#include <boost/fusion/algorithm/iteration/for_each.hpp>

struct Foo1 {
    int foo() const { return 42; }
};

struct Foo2 {
    int bar = 0;
    int foo() { bar = 24; return bar; }
};

int main() {
    using namespace std;
    using namespace boost::fusion;

    Foo1 foo1;
    Foo2 foo2;

    for_each(tie(foo1, foo2), [](auto &foo) {
        cout << foo.foo() << endl;
    });

    cout << "foo2.bar after mutation: " << foo2.bar << endl;
}

http://coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/52c6dfc6e5e9f5ea

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1  
+1 for using C++14 polymorphic lambdas – nurettin May 27 '14 at 11:13

You need to use template metaprogramming, here shown with Boost.Tuple:

#include <boost/tuple/tuple.hpp>
#include <iostream>

template <typename T_Tuple, size_t size>
struct print_tuple_helper {
    static std::ostream & print( std::ostream & s, const T_Tuple & t ) {
        return print_tuple_helper<T_Tuple,size-1>::print( s, t ) << boost::get<size-1>( t );
    }
};

template <typename T_Tuple>
struct print_tuple_helper<T_Tuple,0> {
    static std::ostream & print( std::ostream & s, const T_Tuple & ) {
        return s;
    }
};

template <typename T_Tuple>
std::ostream & print_tuple( std::ostream & s, const T_Tuple & t ) {
    return print_tuple_helper<T_Tuple,boost::tuples::length<T_Tuple>::value>::print( s, t );
}

int main() {

    const boost::tuple<int,char,float,char,double> t( 0, ' ', 2.5f, '\n', 3.1416 );
    print_tuple( std::cout, t );

    return 0;
}

In C++0x, you can write print_tuple() as a variadic template function instead.

share|improve this answer

First define some index helpers:

template <size_t ...I>
struct index_sequence {};

template <size_t N, size_t ...I>
struct make_index_sequence : public make_index_sequence<N - 1, N - 1, I...> {};

template <size_t ...I>
struct make_index_sequence<0, I...> : public index_sequence<I...> {};

With your function you would like to apply on each tuple element:

template <typename T>
/* ... */ foo(T t) { /* ... */ }

you can write:

template<typename ...T, size_t ...I>
/* ... */ do_foo_helper(std::tuple<T...> &ts, index_sequence<I...>) {
    std::tie(foo(std::get<I>(ts)) ...);
}

template <typename ...T>
/* ... */ do_foo(std::tuple<T...> &ts) {
    return do_foo_helper(ts, make_index_sequence<sizeof...(T)>());
}

Or if foo returns void, use

std::tie((foo(std::get<I>(ts)), 1) ... );

Note: On C++14 make_index_sequence is already defined (http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/utility/integer_sequence).

If you do need a left-to-right evaluation order, consider something like this:

template <typename T, typename ...R>
void do_foo_iter(T t, R ...r) {
    foo(t);
    do_foo(r...);
}

void do_foo_iter() {}

template<typename ...T, size_t ...I>
void do_foo_helper(std::tuple<T...> &ts, index_sequence<I...>) {
    do_foo_iter(std::get<I>(ts) ...);
}

template <typename ...T>
void do_foo(std::tuple<T...> &ts) {
    do_foo_helper(ts, make_index_sequence<sizeof...(T)>());
}
share|improve this answer
    
Should cast the return value of foo to void before invoking operator, to avoid possible pathological operator overloading. – Yakk Nov 14 '14 at 21:11

If you want to use std::tuple and you have C++ compiler which supports variadic templates, try code bellow (tested with g++4.5). This should be the answer to your question.

#include <tuple>

// ------------- UTILITY---------------
template<int...> struct index_tuple{}; 

template<int I, typename IndexTuple, typename... Types> 
struct make_indexes_impl; 

template<int I, int... Indexes, typename T, typename ... Types> 
struct make_indexes_impl<I, index_tuple<Indexes...>, T, Types...> 
{ 
    typedef typename make_indexes_impl<I + 1, index_tuple<Indexes..., I>, Types...>::type type; 
}; 

template<int I, int... Indexes> 
struct make_indexes_impl<I, index_tuple<Indexes...> > 
{ 
    typedef index_tuple<Indexes...> type; 
}; 

template<typename ... Types> 
struct make_indexes : make_indexes_impl<0, index_tuple<>, Types...> 
{}; 

// ----------- FOR EACH -----------------
template<typename Func, typename Last>
void for_each_impl(Func&& f, Last&& last)
{
    f(last);
}

template<typename Func, typename First, typename ... Rest>
void for_each_impl(Func&& f, First&& first, Rest&&...rest) 
{
    f(first);
    for_each_impl( std::forward<Func>(f), rest...);
}

template<typename Func, int ... Indexes, typename ... Args>
void for_each_helper( Func&& f, index_tuple<Indexes...>, std::tuple<Args...>&& tup)
{
    for_each_impl( std::forward<Func>(f), std::forward<Args>(std::get<Indexes>(tup))...);
}

template<typename Func, typename ... Args>
void for_each( std::tuple<Args...>& tup, Func&& f)
{
   for_each_helper(std::forward<Func>(f), 
                   typename make_indexes<Args...>::type(), 
                   std::forward<std::tuple<Args...>>(tup) );
}

template<typename Func, typename ... Args>
void for_each( std::tuple<Args...>&& tup, Func&& f)
{
   for_each_helper(std::forward<Func>(f), 
                   typename make_indexes<Args...>::type(), 
                   std::forward<std::tuple<Args...>>(tup) );
}

boost::fusion is another option, but it requires its own tuple type: boost::fusion::tuple. Lets better stick to the standard! Here is a test:

#include <iostream>

// ---------- FUNCTOR ----------
struct Functor 
{
    template<typename T>
    void operator()(T& t) const { std::cout << t << std::endl; }
};

int main()
{
    for_each( std::make_tuple(2, 0.6, 'c'), Functor() );
    return 0;
}

the power of variadic templates!

share|improve this answer
    
I tried your first solution, but it fails with this function on pairs. Any idea why?template <typename T, typename U> void addt(pair<T,U> p) { cout << p.first + p.second << endl; } int main(int argc, char *argv[]) { cout << "Hello." << endl; for_each(make_tuple(2,3,4), [](int i) { cout << i << endl; }); for_each(make_tuple(make_pair(1,2),make_pair(3,4)), addt); return 0; } – user2023370 Jan 16 '12 at 16:45

boost's tuple provides helper functions get_head() and get_tail() so your helper functions may look like this:

inline void call_do_sth(const null_type&) {};

template <class H, class T>
inline void call_do_sth(cons<H, T>& x) { x.get_head().do_sth(); call_do_sth(x.get_tail()); }

as described in here http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_34_0/libs/tuple/doc/tuple_advanced_interface.html

with std::tuple it should be similar.

Actually, unfortunately std::tuple does not seem to provide such interface, so methods suggested before should work, or you would need to switch to boost::tuple which has other benefits (like io operators already provided). Though there is downside of boost::tuple with gcc - it does not accept variadic templates yet, but that may be already fixed as I do not have latest version of boost installed on my machine.

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I might have missed this train, but this will be here for future reference.
Here's my construct based on this answer and on this gist:

#include <tuple>
#include <utility>

template<std::size_t N>
struct tuple_functor
{
    template<typename T, typename F>
    static void run(std::size_t i, T&& t, F&& f)
    {
        const std::size_t I = (N - 1);
        switch(i)
        {
        case I:
            std::forward<F>(f)(std::get<I>(std::forward<T>(t)));
            break;

        default:
            tuple_functor<I>::run(i, std::forward<T>(t), std::forward<F>(f));
        }
    }
};

template<>
struct tuple_functor<0>
{
    template<typename T, typename F>
    static void run(std::size_t, T, F){}
};

You then use it as follow:

template<typename... T>
void logger(std::string format, T... args) //behaves like C#'s String.Format()
{
    auto tp = std::forward_as_tuple(args...);
    auto fc = [](const auto& t){std::cout << t;};

    /* ... */

    std::size_t some_index = ...
    tuple_functor<sizeof...(T)>::run(some_index, tp, fc);

    /* ... */
}

There could be room for improvements.


As per OP's code, it would become this:

const std::size_t num = sizeof...(T);
auto my_tuple = std::forward_as_tuple(t...);
auto do_sth = [](const auto& elem){/* ... */};
for(int i = 0; i < num; ++i)
    tuple_functor<num>::run(i, my_tuple, do_sth);
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