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We want to avoid having a NullReferenceException. Currently we have:

ISomeInterface interface = this.GetISomeInterfaceInstance();
(interface as ClassImplmentsISomeInterface).Method();

This works fine, but risks NullReferenceException. One solution would be:

ISomeInterface interface = this.GetISomeInterfaceInstance();
ClassImplmentsISomeInterface instance = interface as ClassImplmentsISomeInterface;
if (instance != null)
    instance.Method();

But this produces a lot of extra code for a simple check (according to resharper there are 100s of possible NREs.) A second solution method is:

ISomeInterface interface = this.GetISomeInterfaceInstance();
if (interface is ClassImplmentsISomeInterface)
    (interface as ClassImplmentsISomeInterface).Method();

But I gather that is actually uses as in the background, thus doing the cast twice, which I'd like to avoid. Does this matter? For example, is the C# compiler clever enough to optimise this performance issue away?

Is there some other technique I am missing here? Or is one of the above methods preferabled?

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2  
What useful forward progress can your code make if it's been unable to invoke Method()? If the answer is none, then the NRE might be the best thing to happen. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Aug 16 '12 at 9:19
    
@Damien_The_Unbeliever in every case where we risk NRE we can continue without Method() being called - we can silently log and carry on. I would not have asked such a specific question without considering this issue. :) –  Ben Parsons Aug 16 '12 at 10:16

7 Answers 7

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you want to cast speculatively then your first option (as and null check) is recommended. However, you should also consider refactoring the code such that the cast is no longer required.

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I could think of a nice method that will make your code shorter:

public static void InvokeIfIsT<T>(object o, Action<T> action)
{
    if (o is T)
       action((T)o);
}

Use it like that:

ISomeInterface interface = this.GetISomeInterfaceInstance();
InvokeIfIsT<ClassImplmentsISomeInterface>(interface, i => i.Method());
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1  
Good solution. I would rather name the method InvokeIfIsType or IfIsOfTypeDo –  Ilya Ivanov Aug 16 '12 at 9:39
    
That is a good idea. Unfortunately I probably wouldn't get the benefit as the example I used in my question was super simplified. But for anyone with a lot of code of that type it would be great. –  Ben Parsons Aug 16 '12 at 10:08

I personally just use a != null test if I think something might be null. But if it is because you're casting an Interface object to a concrete object then I think you have to take a step back an re-evaluate your design. I deem myself to have failed if I have to cast an Interface object to a concrete object in order to use it.

Using a factory to get an object that implements an interface, but then having to cast it to a concrete object in order to use it is taboo IMHO. If the interface specifies a method then you should not care what sort of object implements the interface. If you care about what the method does, then you should create a different interface and have your concrete class implement that.

Remember that classes can implement as many interfaces as you like.

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Unfortunately this product is ancient - I cannot perform any substantial refactoring at this stage. You are correct though, this is the root cause of the problem. –  Ben Parsons Aug 16 '12 at 10:03
    
That said, in some places this has been done already - but it's not possible in all cases for various reasons. –  Ben Parsons Aug 16 '12 at 10:19
    
You have my deepest sympathies. –  DeanOC Aug 16 '12 at 23:13

You are correct in that is uses as and returns a boolean true if the result is not null (and vice versa)

However I would suggest you take the resharper rule as a hint or guideline rather than a rule to be followed (I would actually turn it off), and I say that because there is nothing wrong with a NullReferenceException being thrown

consider your code

ISomeInterface interface = this.GetISomeInterfaceInstance();
(interface as ClassImplmentsISomeInterface).Method();
 //error thrown above as null reference

now you go ahead and refactor it to

ISomeInterface interface = this.GetISomeInterfaceInstance();
if (interface is ClassImplmentsISomeInterface)
{
    (interface as ClassImplmentsISomeInterface).Method();
}
else
{
    //else?? else what? how do you recover?
}

There is nothing wrong with an exception if an exception is just that, an exception

Now you might say "handling the else scenario is less costly than an exception" but this is only the case if you can recover, for example, if you could write something like this

ISomeInterface interface = this.GetISomeInterfaceInstance();

try
{
    (interface as ClassImplmentsISomeInterface).Method();
}
catch (NullReferenceException)
{
    interface = this.GetIOtherInterface().Method();
}

then it would be worth refactoring into a null check as you are actually doing something useful. If your method can't recover gracefully then somewhere your method needs to throw an exception to it's caller to say "hey, something went wrong"

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Hi Jaimal, thank you for the considered response. In every case I have found, we would (and possibly should) use try-catch blocks as you said lastly. In every case we can recover and continue. –  Ben Parsons Aug 16 '12 at 10:12

In some cases pattern NullObject can deal with it. You can encapsulate casting mechanisms and return NullObject. But again, use it only if it fits your scenario

Null Object pattern wiki page

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You can use the proxy pattern to simulate a NullObject in this way:

class ClassImplmentsISomeInterfaceProxy:ClassImplmentsISomeInterface
{
      ClassImplmentsISomeInterface target;
      ClassImplmentsISomeInterfaceProxy(ISomeInterface actual)
      {
          target=actual as ClassImplmentsISomeInterface;
      }
      //method implementations, with check for null
}

But ensure you really need such design: to amny type checks usually means there is something to refactor.

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I'd usually go with

ISomeInterface variable = this.GetISomeInterfaceInstance();
var myInterface = variable as ClassImplmentsISomeInterface;

if(myInterface != null)
 myInterface.Method();
share|improve this answer
    
So, the first method in the question, but using var. –  Ben Parsons Aug 16 '12 at 10:18
    
@PreetSangha what is nice about it? I cannot see anything new. –  Omtara Aug 16 '12 at 11:37
    
@Omtara - It's been edited since then. –  Preet Sangha Aug 16 '12 at 12:18

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