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I'm using a value converter which needs to get a list of types, which is a property of the converter. If I would use list of double values, I could use the following syntax (which is working as expected):

Code

public class MyConverter : IValueConverter
{
    public List<double> MyList { get; set; }

    // ...
}

XAML

<Converter:MyConverter x:Key="MyConverter">
    <Converter:MyConverter.MyList>
        <System.Double>1</System.Double>
        <System.Double>2</System.Double>
    </Converter:MyConverter.MyList>
</Converter:MyConverter>

But if I try to use this approach with a list of types, an exception is thrown:

Object of type 'System.RuntimeType' cannot be converted to type 'System.Collections.Generic.List`1[System.Type]'

This is my converter and its usage:

Code

public class MyConverter : IValueConverter
{
    public List<Type> MyList { get; set; }

    // ...
}

XAML

<Converter:MyConverter x:Key="MyConverter">
    <Converter:MyConverter.MyList>
        <x:Type TypeName="MyType1" />
        <x:Type TypeName="MyType2" />
    </Converter:MyConverter.MyList>
</Converter:MyConverter>

I guess the XAML syntax is wrong but I can't find the right syntax.

share|improve this question
    
did any of answers work for you? – Artiom Aug 16 '12 at 12:20
    
@Artiom Your answer was quite helpful, thank you. Anyway I want to find out a little bit more about the issue before I decide what is an satisfying answer. – MatthiasG Aug 16 '12 at 13:42
    
Have you tried given solutions? I've updated my and the solution of colinsmith seems to works too – Artiom Aug 17 '12 at 9:21
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Seems like bug in the XAML designer. The given bellow code worked for me. I can build and run application. But In the designer R# hightlights two lines with System:Type and the designer crashes with next two errors per line:

Error 1 Type 'Type' is not usable as an object element because it is not public or does not define a public parameterless constructor or a type converter.
Error 2 The type 'Type' does not support direct content. So when I've tried that solution before (before giving previous solution) I thought I am doing smth wrong. But compiler still doesn't give any error on build. Anyway here how it looks:

<Window.Resources>
    <local:Holder x:Key="one">
        <local:Holder.Types>
            <System:Type>System:Int32</System:Type>
            <System:Type>System:Double</System:Type>
        </local:Holder.Types>
    </local:Holder>
</Window.Resources>
<Grid >
    <ListBox DataContext="{StaticResource one}" ItemsSource="{Binding Path=Types, Converter={StaticResource one}}" />
</Grid>

As far as you can see, the difference is in the declaration. You have to use System.Type rather than x:Type.

and the code as a sample

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Globalization;
using System.Windows.Data;
using System.Linq;

namespace stackProjects
{
    public class Holder : IValueConverter
    {
        public List<Type> Types { get; set; }

        public Holder()
        {
            Types=new List<Type>();
        }

        public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
        {
            return Types.Select(x => x.Name).ToList();
        }

        public object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
        {
            throw new NotImplementedException();
        }
    }
}

As I was said, this happens because Type class is abstract. Hope it helps

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. Although I don't like to give up generics, I will stop using them for the moment. I'm just wondering why generics are no problem when using a list of double values. – MatthiasG Aug 16 '12 at 13:13
    
I have updated my answer – Artiom Aug 17 '12 at 2:00

Ok the example below compiles and runs....I see the converter being called and the list being populated with 2 Type objects. There's probably a better way to do it.


Here's the full code I used:

namespace WpfApplication4
{
    public class MyConverter : IValueConverter
    {
        public IList<Type> MyList { get; set; }

        public MyConverter()
        {
            MyList = new List<Type>();
        }

        public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
        {
            return null;
        }

        public object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
        {
            throw new NotImplementedException();
        }
    }

    public class MyType
    {
        public string Name { get; set; }

        public MyType()
        {

        }
    }
}

<Window x:Class="WpfApplication4.MainWindow"
        xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
        xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
        xmlns:local="clr-namespace:WpfApplication4"
        xmlns:runtime="clr-namespace:System.Runtime.InteropServices;assembly=mscorlib"
        xmlns:sys="clr-namespace:System;assembly=mscorlib"
        Title="MainWindow" Height="350" Width="525">
    <Window.Resources>
        <sys:String x:Key="testdata">TestData</sys:String>
        <x:Array x:Key="listoftypes" Type="{x:Type sys:Type}">
            <x:Type Type="local:MyType"/>
            <x:Type Type="local:MyType"/>
        </x:Array>
        <local:MyConverter x:Key="myconv" MyList="{StaticResource listoftypes}"/>
    </Window.Resources>
    <Grid>
        <TextBlock Text="{Binding Source={StaticResource testdata}, Converter={StaticResource myconv}}"/> 
    </Grid>
</Window>
share|improve this answer
1  
Maybe I should clarify the question. The double list converter is working and was just thought to show how it would work correctly. It is just not working with type lists. – MatthiasG Aug 16 '12 at 9:38

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