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I am working on wpf application and i have to pass some global objects from one class to other, so i am declaring a parameterized construtor for the class, my concern is which one would performance better as a parameter , dictionary or hashtable.
i read this post Difference between Dictionary and Hashtable

following code is using hashtable

      public partial class Sample: Window
        {
      Hashtable session = new Hashtable();

 string Path= string.Empty;
 string PathID= string.Empty;

           public Sample(Hashtable hashtable)
            {
                if (session != null)
                {
                    this.session = hashtable;
                    Path= session["Path"].ToString()
                    PathID= session["MainID"].ToString();
                }
                InitializeComponent();
            }
     private void Window_Loaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
            {
            }
    }
share|improve this question
    
Hashtable is untyped, seems to me you want an IDictionary<string, string>, or better still, define a class that actually represents your settings. – Jodrell Aug 16 '12 at 9:23
    
Dictionary, in my experience, is faster, but read only... You can assign a dictionary, but then only read from it. If you want to edit data in it, you'll have to use a hash table. – SemiDemented Aug 16 '12 at 9:26
1  
@NewAmbition: Why is a Dictionary<TKey, TValue> read-only? Never was ... – O. R. Mapper Aug 16 '12 at 9:28
    
@O.R.Mapper; Read-only as in you can only define it in the beginning, then read from it throughout the application. Dictionary's are meant for quickly finding data in it using wither a key or value. I've never been able to edit a single key/value after defining it. I may be horribly mistaken. – SemiDemented Aug 16 '12 at 9:30
    
@NewAmbition: You can use methods such as Add or Remove whenever you like on a dictionary, and you can also set or overwrite items by using the indexer. – O. R. Mapper Aug 16 '12 at 9:32
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Wouldn't,

public Sample(string path, string mainId)
{
    this.Path = path;
    this.PathID = mainId;

    InitializeComponent();
}

Be simpler, faster and easier to read, bringing errors to compile time etc?


In the event that the values to be passed are too numerous,

class NumerousSettings
{
    public string Path {get; set;};
    public string MainId  {get; set;};
    ...
}

public Sample(NumerousSettings settings)
{
    if (settings == null)
    {
        throw new CallTheDefaultContructorException();
    }

    this.Path = settings.Path;
    this.PathID = settings.MainId;
    ...

    InitializeComponent();
}
share|improve this answer
    
i have shown objects for simplicity ,there are gonaa be more than 2 item in hashtable – Buzz Aug 16 '12 at 9:46
1  
@Buzz, Since you now what the settings will be you can declare a type for them. By using weaker typing or unecessary serialization you are saving up the pain for runtime. A defined compiled type is also faster, there is no lookup time. – Jodrell Aug 16 '12 at 10:00

i read this post Difference between Dictionary and Hashtable

OK, well Marc's answer there seemed pretty clear...

"If you are .NET 2.0 or above, you should prefer Dictionary (and the other generic collections)

A subtle but important difference is that Hashtable supports multiple reader threads with a single writer thread, while Dictionary offers no thread safety. If you need thread safety with a generic dictionary, you must implement your own synchronization or (in .NET 4.0) use ConcurrentDictionary."

If you have no need for thread safety then the Dictionary is the preferred approach for type safety and performance.

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