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I've got two recursive functions:

1)

function getCategories($id)
{
    global $con;
    $select = $con->prepare('SELECT * FROM categories WHERE parent_category_id = :parent_category_id OR (parent_category_id IS NULL AND :parent_category_id IS NULL)');
    $select->bindValue(':parent_category_id', $id, PDO::PARAM_NULL || PDO::PARAM_INT);
    $select->execute();
    // fetching.........
    for() ... getCategories(.......);
}

2)

$select = $con->prepare('SELECT * FROM categories WHERE parent_category_id = :parent_category_id OR (parent_category_id IS NULL AND :parent_category_id IS NULL)');

function getCategories($id)
{
    global $select;
    $select->bindValue(':parent_category_id', $id, PDO::PARAM_NULL || PDO::PARAM_INT);
    $select->execute();
    // fetching.........
    for() ... getCategories(.......);
}

Which is better/faster? Is it better to preapre the statment one time only?

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4  
How about running your code for a hundred thousand iterations and finding out which one is faster? –  Fluffeh Aug 16 '12 at 10:07
1  
Is it better to preapre the statment one time only? - What exactly do you think the point of preparing a statement actually is? –  Leigh Aug 16 '12 at 10:11
    
PARAM_NULL || PARAM_INT - are you sure you want to perform a logical OR, not bitwise OR (|). Also, using globals is asking for troubles. –  Crozin Aug 16 '12 at 10:11
    
@Crozin You are absolutely correct there, but FTR PDO::PARAM_NULL || PDO::PARAM_INT == PDO::PARAM_NULL | PDO::PARAM_INT == 1 == PDO::PARAM_INT - so it will still work as expected, but only because it is that specific combination. Any other combination will result in, effectively, PDO::PARAM_INT (I'm assuming it will be type-coerced to an integer) EDIT Actually thinking about it, bindValue() doesn't even accept a bit mask - and it would make no sense if it did. –  DaveRandom Aug 16 '12 at 10:19
    
Thank you very much! –  Vito Nordloh Aug 16 '12 at 14:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Second one should be faster because you don't call not needed statements. The idea of prepared statements is that you must prepare it once. But the best way to find out is profiling.

Here's simple way:

$start = microtime(true);

for ($i = 0; $i < 1000000; $i++){
     //your code here
}

echo microtime(true) - $start;
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1  
You are too generous, but +1 nontheless :) –  Fluffeh Aug 16 '12 at 10:15
    
@Fluffeh Thank you. I try to be kind with people who have tried something. I hate "code-beggars". –  Leri Aug 16 '12 at 10:21

Your second function is definitely a lot faster, especially when it is executed very often. Because that is the main reason why prepared statements were invented: your SQL server has to parse and optimize your query only once. But in your first solution you would not even need prepared statements. So in my opinion a profiling test is only needed to find out how much faster the second one is and not to find out wether it is faster.

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Second variant is faster, because you prepare "template" (with prepare() method) and then you send values to template and execute query in every iteration.

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