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I have a multiple table query that looks something like:

SELECT tree.name, tree.type, branch.name, branch.type, leaf.name, leaf.type 
FROM tree, branch, leaf 
WHERE leaf.branch_id = branch.id 
   AND branch.tree_id = tree.id
ORDER by field(tree.type, 'Poplar', 'Birch', 'Hazelnut')

So this gives me all leaf entries that belong to any of the three tree entries.

Now, I would really only like to return the leaf entries that belong to ONE tree, in the order specified.

So if there are leaf entries belonging to a Poplar tree, only display these. However, if there are no Poplar leaf entries, only display leaf entries belonging to the Birch tree.

There could be any number of leaf entries. I just want the ones on a tree that appears in my priority list. Ideally just using one query.

Any ideas? Thanks in advance....

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1  
please draw table structure with essential dummy data and your desired output on sqlfiddle.com –  diEcho Aug 16 '12 at 10:32

3 Answers 3

try this:

SELECT * FROM
(
    SELECT tree.name, tree.type, branch.name, branch.type, leaf.name, leaf.type, 
           IF(@var_type = '' OR a.type = @var_type, a.type := @var_type, 0) AS check_flag
    FROM tree, branch, leaf, (SELECT @var_type := '')
    WHERE leaf.branch_id = branch.id
          AND branch.tree_id = tree.id
    ORDER by field(tree.type, 'Poplar', 'Birch', 'Hazelnut')
) a
WHERE check_flag <> 0;
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1  
Can you explain this? Note that this is not a valid MySQL query and to be honest I cannot figure out what it's supposed to be doing. –  adam Aug 16 '12 at 11:29

Here is one way to do it. This query first finds the appropriate tree type for each leaf. It then joins this information back in:

select tree.name, tree.type, branch.name, branch.type, leaf.name, leaf.type
from (SELECT leaf.id,
             min(case when tree.type = 'Poplar' then tree.id end) as poplarid,
             min(case when tree.type = 'Birch' then tree.id end) as birchid,
             min(case when tree.type = 'Hazelnut' then tree.id end) as hazelid
      FROM leaf join
           branch
           on leaf.branch_id = branch.id join
           tree
           on branch.tree_id = tree.id join
      group by leaf.id
     ) lt join
     leaf
     on leaf.leaf_id = lt.leaf_id join
     branch
     on leaf.branch_id = branch.id join
     tree
     on tree.id = branch.tree_id
where tree.id = coalesce(lt.poplarid, lt.birchid, lt.hazelid)
ORDER by field(tree.type, 'Poplar', 'Birch', 'Hazelnut')
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I would suggest using http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/string-functions.html#function_find-in-set

With that you can do

    SELECT * FROM (
    SELECT find_in_set(tree.type, "Poplar,Birch,Hazelnut") as sequence, tree.name, tree.type,    branch.name, branch.type, leaf.name, leaf.type 
    FROM tree, branch, leaf 
    WHERE leaf.branch_id = branch.id 
       AND branch.tree_id = tree.id
    ORDER by sequence
    ) WHERE sequence = 1
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I got fairly far with this method, although there were some errors (I have made edits appropriately) however the sequence = 1 doesn't account for there being missing trees (only selects Poplar).... ideally I want sequence = min(sequence) - Can you help further? –  adam Aug 16 '12 at 11:41
    
@Adam I assumed from reading the docs that find_in_set(field, listSet) should return a sequence, not position in the listSet, but I may have been wrong. You may need HAVING sequence = min(sequence). ORDER BY is irrelevant here because you are selecting only one value anyway. I don't have access to MySQL server at the moment to test the above. –  Germann Arlington Aug 16 '12 at 12:07

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