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I am currently trying to learn C++11 and its fancy features. To be specific I am searching for high efficiency genericity. So I happily wrote a program in C++11 to sort lines of an input file to test my fresh skills. Because of inlining and nice features of C++ compilers I expected high performance on this small example. To get a hint at how fast was my program I hacked exactly the same program in C using the qsort function, since it is raw C no inlining is performed on this function and my comparison function is called with an indirection and needs to do two indirections to access char * pointers representing strings.

The facts

Yet, I was very surprised by the results, C seems 4 times faster than C++. On a 8Mb file, I get the following results:

$ g++ -O3 -std=c++11 -o sort sort.C
$ time ./sort < huge > /dev/null

real    0m0.415s
user    0m0.397s
sys     0m0.013s

$ cc -O3 -Wall -o sortc sort.c
$ time ./sortc < huge  > /dev/null

real    0m0.104s
user    0m0.097s
sys     0m0.010s

$ wc -l huge
140190 huge

Note that I tried to be as fair as possible, compilation options are the same and my C program (dumped later) behave the same way as the C++ one: no limit on the size of the input lines and no limit on the number of input lines.

I also noticed that while my C program calls malloc almost once for each input line, the C++ program has a ratio of 10 allocations per input line!

The code

Here are the two programs I used to make my comparison.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
#include <memory>

int main () {
    typedef std::vector<std::string> svec;
    svec a;
    std::string s;

    for (;;) {
        getline(std::cin, s);
        if (std::cin.eof()) {
            if (s != "")
                a.push_back(std::move(s));
            break;
        }
        a.push_back(std::move(s));
    }
    std::sort(a.begin(), a.end());
    for (std::string &s : a) {
        std::cout << s << "\n";
    }
}

And my much more verbose C version.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

#define BUFSZ 100
size_t getl(char **line, size_t len) {
        char buf[BUFSZ];
        size_t i, n;

        for (i=0; i<BUFSZ; i++) {
                int c = getchar();

                if (c == EOF || c == '\n') {
                        *line = malloc(len+i+1);
                        memcpy(&(*line)[len], buf, i);
                        (*line)[len+i] = 0;
                        return i;
                }
                buf[i] = c;
        }

        n = getl(line, len+i);
        memcpy(&(*line)[len], buf, i);
        return i+n;
}

#define ARRAYSZ 30
struct Array {
        char **lv;
        size_t li, lc;
};

void addline(struct Array *a, char *line) {
        if (a->li == a->lc) {
                a->lc *= 2;
                a->lv = realloc(a->lv, a->lc * sizeof *a->lv);
        }
        a->lv[a->li++] = line;
}

int cmp(const void *a, const void *b) {
        return strcmp(*(const char **)a, *(const char **)b);
}

int main(void) {
        char *line;
        struct Array a;
        size_t i;

        a.li = 0;
        a.lc = ARRAYSZ;
        a.lv = malloc(a.lc * sizeof *a.lv);

        for (;;) {
                getl(&line, 0);
                if (feof(stdin)) {
                        if (line[0] != 0)
                                addline(&a, line);
                        else
                                free(line);
                        break;
                }
                addline(&a, line);
        }
        qsort(a.lv, a.li, sizeof *a.lv, cmp);
        for (i=0; i<a.li; i++) {
                printf("%s\n", a.lv[i]);
                free(a.lv[i]);
        }
        free(a.lv);
        return 0;
}

Question

Could someone tell me where my C++ program must be changed (without becoming plain C) to be faster? I tried to stay very idiomatic, is it a good way to hack in C++ or should I tend to write C-like code when I want high performance? Why is the C++ program allocating that much on the heap, how can I reduce this?

Edits

By popular demand I display the results of the profiling of my C++ program. Here is the funny output of the profiler for my C++ program (first two lines):

Each sample counts as 0.01 seconds.
 %   cumulative   self              self     total           
time   seconds   seconds    calls  ms/call  ms/call  name    
40.03      0.02     0.02  1198484     0.00     0.00  __gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<std::string*, std::vector<std::string, std::allocator<std::string> > >::operator--()
30.02      0.04     0.02  2206802     0.00     0.00  bool std::operator< <char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >(std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > const&, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > const&)

As I read it, it seems that allocation is not the only reason.

share|improve this question
5  
Try using a profiler, I am pretty sure the sorting in C++ is faster, it is the input that is rather slow. If you want to measure the speed of sorting, do only that by e.g. wrapping the sort operations into some timing operations. Measuring the whole program run also adds static intialization overhead of the c++ library, which is likely significant too. –  PlasmaHH Aug 16 '12 at 11:12
3  
Try not including the input and output in your measurement (use std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now() for example) –  R. Martinho Fernandes Aug 16 '12 at 11:13
1  
Check whether the IO is the cause. Sorting should be almost equivalent between the two, with C++ slightly faster @ -O2. –  nhahtdh Aug 16 '12 at 11:13
1  
You should time the sorting operation inside the program, and leave loading the data to memory out of it. You can write the timing code in assembly (using rdtsc) to avoid discrepancies there. –  Noora Aug 16 '12 at 11:16
3  
I doubt that it would improve performance, but a more idiomatic way to write the read loop is while (getline(std::cin, s)) a.emplace_back(s); –  Ferruccio Aug 16 '12 at 11:19

5 Answers 5

up vote 26 down vote accepted

The cause is in c++ std io synchronization. The following code:

int main () {
    typedef std::vector<std::string> svec;
    svec a;
    std::string s;

    // note
    std::ios_base::sync_with_stdio(false);

    for (;;) {
    getline(std::cin, s);
    if (std::cin.eof()) {
        if (s != "")
            a.push_back(std::move(s));
        break;
    }
        a.push_back(std::move(s));
    }
    std::sort(a.begin(), a.end());
    for (std::string &s : a) {
        std::cout << s << "\n";
    }
}

gives

 real   0m0.106s
 user   0m0.104s
 sys    0m0.004s

The C-version gives this:

 real   0m0.167s
 user   0m0.164s
 sys    0m0.000s

Edit: As RiaD correct mentioned sync_with_stdio of course is static function, so it enough to call the function once for all std io streams.

share|improve this answer
8  
Or, more generally, "if you're trying to compare the speed of two languages, eliminate all the I/O". Really, why are you trying to read files as part of a performance test between C and C++? A harddrive is incredibly slow no matter which language your code is written in. It's not very interesting to look at. (Also, IOStream is really incredibly slow in all major implementations, and hardly C++'s finest point) –  jalf Aug 16 '12 at 11:36
7  
@jalf: well, the speed of reading and sorting a file is a reasonable thing to investigate. It's just that judging by the question title, that's not what the questioner set out to do. If most of my programs do a fair amount of I/O, and I'm not allowed to include the speed of "idiomatic" I/O or the standard I/O libraries in my language comparisons, then quite possibly I would make a poor choice. That said, I tend make the simplifying assumption that if the language has memory mapped files then disk I/O performance is manageable, and if it doesn't then you get what you're given... –  Steve Jessop Aug 16 '12 at 11:42
2  
@jalf: How would you know that iostreams had performance issues if you never measured it against something else? –  Nicol Bolas Aug 16 '12 at 12:51
8  
I guess you can say, "file I/O speed isn't relevant to a comparison between C++ and C, because all of C's I/O facilities are available in C++, and iostreams should not be regarded as 'the way to do I/O in C++', rather it should be regarded as a fancy API for people who don't care about I/O speed". What you can't say is, "when comparing languages in general, eliminate all the I/O". Because unlike C++, many languages don't give you access to C-style I/O. However slow your disk is, I/O libraries make it even slower, and some more than others. –  Steve Jessop Aug 16 '12 at 14:05
3  
btw,sync_with_stdio is static method and it affects all in/out operations, you needn't call it twice. cplusplus.com/reference/iostream/ios_base/sync_with_stdio –  RiaD Aug 16 '12 at 15:53

You're also using two different I/O libraries. This will completely screw up any timing information, as the C and C++ I/O libs are very different. IOstreams are plain not designed for speed.

In addition, I/O is completely untimable. If the source of I/O data simply happened to be coming in slower one time, one program would appear to be slower regardless of the sort time- for example, if the OS happened to have it in cache for one run but not for another.

You need to time purely the time taken to sort a pre-existing std::vector<std::string>, say.

Oh yeah, and your getl is full of memory leak.

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 Always experiment with varying one feature at the time. –  TemplateRex Aug 16 '12 at 11:26
    
Could you give more details about getl? –  mpu Aug 16 '12 at 11:36
    
You malloc in getl as many times as you need to resize, but only free it once at the end of the program. When you resize you don't consider that you need to free the previous memory. –  Puppy Aug 16 '12 at 11:36
1  
Hm, I think you need to read more carefully my function. And if you need to be convinced, valgrind returns that all allocated blocks in my program are freed. Please be more careful when you openly criticize. –  mpu Aug 16 '12 at 11:39
1  
@mpu he misread your code. No need to get upset. He didn't insult your family, he pointed out what he thought was a problem in your code –  jalf Aug 16 '12 at 11:59

My guess is that you don't measure sorting speed, but memory reallocations. Instead of doing a.push_back one element at a time, try allocating the vector memory upfront like you did with the C program

a.reserve(num_lines);

Depending on whether your compiler uses re-allocations with an expansion factor of 1.5 (VC++) or 2 (g++), you have 29 and 17 re-allocations with 140,190 lines in your file (i.e. log(total lines) / log(expansion factor)).

The comment by R. Martinho Fernandes also hits the nail: use std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now() around the sort statements in both programs to get the timing differences. This isolates you from memory and IO differences.

share|improve this answer
    
Shouldn't smaller expansion factor trigger more reallocations? –  nhahtdh Aug 16 '12 at 11:18
    
@nhahtdh Yes, but there is a paradox: if the expansion factor is larger than 1.61... (the golden ratio) then you can never re-use the old memory during an expansion. In this case VC++ is faster even if it does more reallocations than g++. –  TemplateRex Aug 16 '12 at 11:20
    
I tried to add a.reserve(30) to be fair wrt my C program (it starts with an array of size 30) but there does not seem to have any performance improvement. Yet I agree with you that I might be watching at the number of reallocations (since I have more that 1,000,000 allocations for the C++ run!). –  mpu Aug 16 '12 at 11:21
    
@rhalbersma: Do you have any reference to that? –  nhahtdh Aug 16 '12 at 11:23
2  
@nhahtdh it's explained in the Facebook Folly library, and in some of Alexandrescu's talks github.com/facebook/folly/blob/master/folly/docs/FBVector.md –  TemplateRex Aug 16 '12 at 11:24

Others have noted that most of what you're measuring is the speed of the I/O library. I think it's worth noting, however, that contrary to some statements that have been made here, C++ iostreams can be entirely competitive with I/O using C FILE *s. So, what you're measuring is mostly "how crappy are gcc's iostreams?", not "how crappy are iostreams in general?"

For example, I started by concatenating together all the .txt files I had in one directory to create a fairly large text file. I then compiled your C code with VC++ 10 and used it to sort that file (writing the output to another file). That ran in 3.2 seconds.

I also wrote what I'd consider reasonably idiomatic C++ to do the same task:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
#include <string>
#include <iterator>

class line { 
    std::string data;
public:
    friend std::istream &operator>>(std::istream &is, line &l) { 
        return std::getline(is, l.data);
    }
    operator std::string() const { return data; }
};

int main() { 
    std::vector<std::string> vec(
        (std::istream_iterator<line>(std::cin)),
        std::istream_iterator<line>());

    std::sort(vec.begin(), vec.end());
    std::copy(vec.begin(), vec.end(), 
        std::ostream_iterator<std::string>(std::cout, "\n"));

    return 0;
}

This is about the same length as your C++ code, but (I'd claim) simpler than either of your programs. If you actually cared, it would be pretty easy to make it somewhat shorter still. It makes no particular attempt at optimization at all. Compiled with VC++ 10 (with the same optimization flags as I used on your C code -- -O2b2 -GL) it runs in 2.8 seconds, roughly 10% faster than your C code.

I'd expect that if you run this on Linux, you'll find that it's slower than your C code. Adding the two sync_with_stdio(false); calls will probably fix that, just like they did with your C++ code. The sync_with_stdio(false); calls generally make quite a large difference on Linux, but I've never been able to measure any improvement from using them on Windows (with any of the compilers I've tried -- VC++ and MinGW recently, and longer ago Intel, Comeau, CygWin, and Borland as well).

share|improve this answer

I/O issues aside (not to say that these aren't genuine), the two sorts do two different things. The C++ version moves string objects around, and the C version moves pointers. The latter will usually (see below) be faster. Rewrite the C++ code to move pointers instead of objects, i.e. use a std::vector<std::string*>, and explicitly new each string object. Yes, it's not idiomatic, but it's a fairer speed comparison.

If std::sort is move-aware, moving strings becomes much faster, and std::vector<std::string> doesn't suffer anywhere near as much. But move semantics are new in C++11, and even if you have a C++11 compiler, move semantics may not have migrated into std::sort.

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