Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a table whose second row ,first column contains another table. I want to set a background color to the parent table rows but it should not be applied to child table rows. For that I am trying use CSS Child-selector (>).But its not working ...Can anybody tel me the reason.

Here is my piece of code:

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC>
<html>
 <head>
   <style>
   table.tab > tr{
     background:red;
   }
  </style>
 </head>

 <body>
  <table class="tab">
   <tr>
    <td>asdf</td><td>afda</td><td>asdfdsa</td>
   </tr>

   <tr>
    <td colspan="3">
      <table>
       <tr>
          <td>afds</td><td>Trkaladf</td><td>inner Tab</td>
       </tr>
      </table>
    </td>
   </tr>

  </table>
 </body>
</html>
share|improve this question
7  
Not an answer, but when adding tables to tables you are probbaly doing it wrong. I.e.: using tables for layouting. –  PeeHaa Aug 16 '12 at 11:19
2  
Note that the doctype you are using will cause quirks mode for your page in browsers. –  Alohci Aug 16 '12 at 11:32
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

table.tab > tbody > tr indeed gives the style to only the first row. If you take a look at the DOM with firebug, you can confirm it. The first row of the child table doesn't get styled the same way.

However, since your child table is inside a table row that has a red background, and the child table has no background specified, the child table will have no background - and thus you still see the red background "through" the child table.

Possible solution - styling the child table as well with a different background:

table.tab > tbody >  tr {
 background:red;
}

table.tab table > tbody > tr{
 background:white;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

I think some browsers like to auto-render a tbody element nested between table and tr which will cause your direct-child selector to not work.

table.tab > tbody > tr, table.tab > tr{
     background:red;
   }​

http://jsfiddle.net/vppXL/


However, if this content is for layout and not tabular data, you should not be using a table element.

share|improve this answer
    
You're fiddle doesnt match your answer. –  PeeHaa Aug 16 '12 at 11:22
    
still colors all rows into red in Chrome - jsfiddle.net/vppXL/1 –  Zoltan Toth Aug 16 '12 at 11:28
    
@ZoltanToth No the nested tr is not colored. Its parent is however, and as the nested tr doesn't have a color, the parent color is shown –  Curt Aug 16 '12 at 11:33
    
@ZoltanToth If you were to style the nested tr, this would apply a background color to it, and not override any other colour –  Curt Aug 16 '12 at 11:34
    
No the nested tr is not colored. Its parent is - that makes sense. But how does that helps the OP if he still needs a second rule to define the nested tr color? Why to mess with direct children > and tbody if you can just do table.tab tr for all, and table.tab td tr for nested? –  Zoltan Toth Aug 16 '12 at 12:08
show 1 more comment

Best thing to do is set your <thead> and <tbody> sections yourself, like so:

<table class="tab">
    <thead>
        <tr>
            <td>asdf</td>
            <td>afda</td>
            <td>asdfdsa</td>
        </tr>
    </thead>
    <tbody>
        <tr>
            <td colspan="3">
                <table>
                    <tr>
                        <td>afds</td>
                        <td>Trkaladf</td>
                        <td>inner Tab</td>
                    </tr>
                </table>
            </td>
        </tr>
    </tbody>
</table>​

Then you can choose set your markup to target rows in your tbody, but not thead:

table.tab tbody {
    background: red;
}​

However, it's better to set your background-color on your <td> elements instead with:

table.tab > tbody > tr > td {
    background: red;
}​

There's a jsFiddle example here.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.