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I am working on an application that reads and processes data over a network. While testing the connecting/disconnecting logic of the program I noticed that my consumer thread was not closing when it reached it's closing condition. Below is a stripped out version of the consumer class.

import java.io.InputStream;

public class Consumer implements Runnable
{
   private final InputStream input;
   public Consumer(InputStream input)
   {
      this.input = input;
   }
   @Override
   public void run()
   {      
      byte readBuffer[];
      readBuffer = new byte[1];
      int goodData;

      try
      {
         while(input.available() > 0)
         {
            goodData = input.read(readBuffer);
            while (goodData > 0 )
            {
               System.out.println(readBuffer[0]);
               if ( readBuffer[0] == 27 )
               {
                  System.out.println("Consumer: found closing byte and closing thread "+Thread.currentThread().getName());
                  //this is the last packet, so interupt thread to close
              Thread.currentThread().interrupt();
              //return;
              //Thread.currentThread().stop(new InterruptedException("Attempting to close"));
               }
               goodData = input.read(readBuffer);
            }
         }
      }
      catch(Exception e)
      {
         System.out.println("closing "+Thread.currentThread().getName() +" because of an exception "+e.getClass());
         return;
      }
      System.out.println("closing "+Thread.currentThread().getName());
   }
}

I created a dummy main class that demonstrates the problem.

public class ExampleOfInterruptNotWorking
{
   public static void main(String[] args)
   {
      byte[] bytesToWrite = new byte[]{0, 1, 2,3,4,5,6,65,23,65,21,54,13,54,1,76};
      Consumer C;
      Thread ConsumerThread;
      PipedInputStream PIS = null;
      PipedOutputStream POS = null;
      try
      {
         PIS = new PipedInputStream();
         POS = new PipedOutputStream(PIS);
         C = new Consumer(PIS);
         ConsumerThread = new Thread(C);

         ConsumerThread.start();

         POS.write(bytesToWrite);
         POS.write(bytesToWrite);
         bytesToWrite[1] = 27;
         POS.write(bytesToWrite);

         ConsumerThread.join();

      }
      catch(Exception e)
      {
         System.err.println("Unexpected exception in main");
         e.printStackTrace(System.err);
      }
      finally
      {
         try
         {
            PIS.close();
            POS.close();
         }
         catch(Exception ex)
         {
        //shouldn't happen in example
         }
         System.out.println("exiting main");
      }
   }
}

When you run this code as written, the consumer detects the interrupt, but does not stop execution until the pipe is empty (not what I want). Just to try, I changed to a Thread.stop() call which did what I wanted, but I don't want to leave that in production code. I realized that I could use a simple return statement, but this is not the only point the thread could exit, and I'd like to have some common exit code that cleans up resources. So, my question is, why is the consumer thread not being interrupted? and is there a good way for me to be able to have common exit code?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
It was not interrupted because it was not waiting and you didn't send it a message. Good way is to close a stream when you finished writing. –  Roman C Aug 16 '12 at 12:05
    
The return statement is looking like your best bet. Can you please try to demonstrate the problem where you say you can't create "some common exit code that cleans up resources"? Usually, you do that in a finally block. –  John Watts Aug 16 '12 at 12:06
    
@RomanC I don't really like closing streams out from under something that is reading them. In this particular case, I am getting a return message to a close connection request. With how the application was designed, I cannot guarantee that the close message is the last one sent out. As it was posted below "Exceptions are for exceptional cases" and closing a stream would cause an IOException - when I would already know the stream was closing. –  adeady Aug 16 '12 at 12:20
    
@JohnWatts I was under the impression that adding a return statement inside that if block would exit the method, bypassing a finally block. –  adeady Aug 16 '12 at 12:39
    
Nope. finally always happens if you leave a block unless the VM process (or the executing thread) itself dies. But exceptions and return do not prevent it. –  John Watts Aug 16 '12 at 15:24
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

InterruptedExceptions are thrown when a thread is sleeping, waiting for a join etc. (basically any interruptable blocking call) and interrupt() is called.

If you thread is running then the thread interrupt flag will be set but no exception will be thrown, you should check the flag with myThread.isInterrupted().

You can find more information here: http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/java/library/j-jtp05236/index.html

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reference. I was assuming that the interrupt() call actually interrupted the thread. If it just sets a status bit, that makes more sense. –  adeady Aug 16 '12 at 12:24
    
+1 for a good article link. It's clear that while (!Thread.currentThread().isInterrupted()) ... (or similar check) should be added to the run() method to resolve the issue –  Brad Aug 16 '12 at 13:45
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Which method do you expect to throw InterruptedException? Thread.interrupt() is not throwing it, neither any of your methods. So where do you expect this checked exception should come from?

Your code is not working because interrupt() barely sets the interrupted flag on a thread. You must check that flag explicitly using Thread.isInterrupted(). InterruptedException is only thrown if the thread in question was sleeping or blocking at the time. So if you interrupt different thread and that thread was sleeping, sleep() will throw InterruptedException.

Now to address your problem in detail. Exceptions are for exceptional cases. The fact your thread finished processing is not exceptional case, it's something you definitely expect. For the same reason reading a file past the end is not throwing an exception - end of file is something you should definitely expect - all files have end. Moreover you should not use exceptions to control program flow.

In your case either use return statement (when run() returns, thread dies) or break your loop in some other way. You posted too much code to analyze.

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You could simply use break to label

OUTER:
     while(input.available() > 0)
     {
        goodData = input.read(readBuffer);
        while (goodData > 0 )
        {
           System.out.println(readBuffer[0]);
           if ( readBuffer[0] == 27 )
           {
              System.out.println("Consumer: found closing byte and closing thread "+Thread.currentThread().getName());
              //this is the last packet, so interupt thread to close
          //Thread.currentThread().interrupt();
          break OUTER;
          //return;
          //Thread.currentThread().stop(new InterruptedException("Attempting to close"));
           }
           goodData = input.read(readBuffer);
        }
     }
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