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I have a table looking like this created with sqlite.

CREATE TABLE Cars ( 

POWER DOUBLE ,
CAPACITY DOUBLE,
SPEED DOUBLE,   
TIME INTEGER  NOT NULL,
TYPE INTEGER  NOT NULL, 
MODEL INTEGER  NOT NULL,

PRIMARY KEY ( TIME, TYPE, MODEL ));

There are 15 different values of TYPE, and each type have 20 different values of MODEL. For every model there is inserted a new record every 10th second.

A little example:

POWER----TIME----TYPE----MODEL
45.6     2588     3       14
46.8     2588     3       15
44.7     2588     3       16

This table is really huge with millions of rows.

As you can see my primary key is (TIME, TYPE, MODEL) because that is making a unique identifier.

My application runs a select query several times which can take a really long time when when the time range is large, or if I run the query for several models.

For example I run this type of query quite often:

SELECT power, time, type, model 
FROM CARS 
WHERE type = 3 AND model = 14 AND time BETWEEN 2588 and 13550;

I have tried to experiment with a primary key like (TYPE, MODEL, TIME) which has increased the performance for some situations, but not over a large time interval.

My question is how I can optimize this retrieval of records, and what primary key that seems to be optimal for this situation?

Insertions and updates are not an issue in terms of performance.

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What are your indexes? –  user647772 Aug 16 '12 at 12:04
    
Use indexing to improve performance –  Rafael Osipov Aug 16 '12 at 12:05
    
Well, the only type of indexing I'm using is the primary key. I'm sorry if it was something else you meant? –  Ole-M Aug 16 '12 at 12:08
    
What columns would I then typically index to increase the performance? –  Ole-M Aug 16 '12 at 12:16
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The order of fields in your primary key should reflect how selective each one is going to be (most selective first).

Superficially, time should appear to come first, since selecting on a specific time would return fewer records than a specific type or model.

However, if most or all of your queries are going to select a range of times, then it would be better to have the time at the end of the primary key, since range selection is less selective than specific values.

I suggest changing the primary key to be (model, type, time) - in that order.

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The general guidance offered on MSDN on composite keys is that you put the columns with the highest cardinality (i.e. most unique values) at the root of the key/index.

So in your case, the key should be as you have it - i.e. :

CREATE TABLE Cars ( 
  PRIMARY KEY ( TIME, TYPE, MODEL ),
  POWER DOUBLE ,
  CAPACITY DOUBLE,
  SPEED DOUBLE,   
  TIME INTEGER NOT NULL,
  TYPE INTEGER NOT NULL, 
  MODEL INTEGER NOT NULL
);

This will only perform well for queries where you know the value of TIME.

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OK. I always know the time range, so that's not an issue. So I guess I can't really improve the performance any more :/ –  Ole-M Aug 16 '12 at 12:18
    
@Ole-M: If you are always going to be selecting by a range of time rather than a specific time, then it would make more sense to put the other fields first (assuming you're only going to select specific values of type and model). –  Mark Bannister Aug 16 '12 at 12:21
    
@MarkBannister OK. I will always be selecting a time rang. But every 10th second, 300 (15*20) different values are inserted. So then each of these bunches with 300 values will be sorted on (model, type, time), but when the next 300 values are inserted, the order will start again with type nr 1 first. So the whole database wouldn't be ordered on (model, type, time) anyway, unless there is a way to do it when I'm finsihed with all the insertions? –  Ole-M Aug 16 '12 at 12:37
1  
@Ole-M: If you are accessing via the index then it will be the index that determines the access order, not the order in which records are inserted into the table. (In most relational databases, the order in which records are inserted into a table is not necessarily the order in which they are stored, anyway.) –  Mark Bannister Aug 16 '12 at 12:50
    
@MarkBannister Thank you! Made it a lot clearer to me :) –  Ole-M Aug 16 '12 at 12:55
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