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In the 2nd case below, Python tries to look for a local variable. When it doesn't find one, why can't it look in the outer scope like it does for the 1st case?

This looks for x in the local scope, then outer scope:

def f1():
    x = 5
    def f2():
         print x

This gives local variable 'x' referenced before assignment error:

def f1():
    x = 5
    def f2():
        x+=1

I am not allowed to modify the signature of function f2() so I can not pass and return values of x. However, I do need a way to modify x. Is there a way to explicitly tell Python to look for a variable name in the outer scope (something similar to the global keyword)?

Python version: 2.7

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marked as duplicate by mhlester May 16 '14 at 15:32

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
python 3 provides nonlocal for this purpose, but I think it's worth asking why you need to do this. This is a little safer than using global, but still doesn't feel right. –  mgilson Aug 16 '12 at 12:52
1  
@mgilson there are many good reasons to do this, see e.g. the rationale section in pep-3104. –  thebjorn Aug 16 '12 at 12:58
    
what version of python do you use? –  soulcheck Aug 16 '12 at 13:00
    
@soulcheck I use Python 2.7, edited that in my question. –  Dhara Aug 16 '12 at 13:02
    
@Dhara sorry, don't know why the comment got posted. It was fairly obvious that you're on 2.7. –  soulcheck Aug 16 '12 at 13:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted
def f1():
    x = { 'value': 5 }
    def f2():
        x['value'] += 1

Workaround is to use a mutable object and update members of that object. Name binding is tricky in Python, sometimes.

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This works, although I ended up using a list with a single element instead of a dictionary. Thanks! –  Dhara Aug 17 '12 at 7:21
    
I think it is more correct to use nonlocal or global –  ikaros45 Dec 3 '13 at 8:39
    
Global is not a good idea as it will pollute the global namespace. Nonlocal is a python 3 feature, and this question specified python 2.7. –  Tom Whittock Dec 4 '13 at 11:08

In Python 3.x this is possible:

def f1():
        x = 5
        def f2():
                nonlocal x
                x+=1
        return f2

The problem and a solution to it, for Python 2.x as well, are given in this post. Additionally, please read PEP 3104 for more information on this subject.

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I just looked this up. nonlocal is the statement to use here. –  mgilson Aug 16 '12 at 12:50
    
use global instead of nonlocal for python 2.x –  User Aug 16 '12 at 13:38
1  
@user1320237 global does not work instead of nonlocal -- that was precisely my question! –  Dhara Aug 16 '12 at 18:11

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