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I inherited some code which, when trying to add some features, isn't working for me properly. I'm no expert at Java web, so I apologize in advance if I need any extra hand-holding to get you the information you need.

I'm developing a GWT application which is using Hibernate and Guice-Persist on the back-end to persist to MySQL. Unfortunately, I'm hitting a weird problem in which -- on one server -- a put transaction is not persisting to the database in time to be recognized by a subsequent get transaction. Everything works perfectly in whatever version of Jetty is embedded with the GWT Eclipse plugin (possibly 6.1.11?) in Windows and in Tomcat6 in Linux, but when I try to run it in Linux using jetty-maven-plugin version 8.1.0 (also in 8.1.5, the only two version I've tried), I get this problem with the transaction not completing in time. (Alternatively, I'd be thrilled with a solution that just allows me to properly run my integration tests in Maven using something other than Jetty to sidestep this problem all-together. It certainly seems that the code works in every other server context I've tried).

Here's the code I'm using to persist an object:

public T put(T entity) {
    EntityManager entityManager = entityManager();
    EntityTransaction transaction = entityManager.getTransaction();        
    transaction.begin();
    try {
        entity = entityManager.merge(entity);
        entityManager.persist(entity);
        transaction.commit();

    } catch (Exception e) {
        //do exception handling, including rollback
    }


    return entity;
}

And the get code:

public List<T> getAll() {
    Query query = entityManager().createQuery("select c from " + clazz.getSimpleName() + " c");

    return (List<T>) query.getResultList();
}

Again, what's happening is that I make an (indirect) call to getAll() to allow the client to see the data. Then if they make a selection, make a put call from the client. Then once I get the response, make a call to getAll() to update the data displayed to the user. Unfortunately, the data I'm getting back from the database doesn't reflect the updated data, but instead the data as it existed before the put() call. The database does eventually update, and when I check the database myself, it seems to be updated instantly. The web application, too, will eventually update to show the proper data if I reload the data a few times. So I'm suspect of some caching layer which may be responding to my getAll() request without actually checking the database, but am really not sure how to proceed -- Transactions and EntityManagers are fairly new to me.

I've tried flush()ing and close()ing my Entity Manager instead of committing my transaction and haven't had any change in behavior.

I'm injecting my EntityManager Provider in the constructor:

private final Class<T> clazz;
private final Provider<EntityManager> entityManagerProvider;

public BaseDao(final Class<T> clazz, final Provider<EntityManager> entityManagerProvider) {
    this.clazz = clazz;
    this.entityManagerProvider = entityManagerProvider;
}

and getting an entity manager like so:

protected EntityManager entityManager() {
    return entityManagerProvider.get();
}

Thanks!

For posterity's sake, here's my GuiceServletContextListener:

public class GuiceServletConfig extends GuiceServletContextListener {
@Override
protected Injector getInjector() {
    DispatchServletModule dispatchServletModule = new DispatchServletModule();
    Injector injector = Guice.createInjector(new ServerModule(), new JpaPersistModule(getPersistenceUnit()),
            dispatchServletModule);

    PersistService persistService = injector.getInstance(PersistService.class);
    persistService.start();

    BootStrapper bootStrapper = injector.getInstance(BootStrapper.class);
    bootStrapper.init();



    return injector;
}

private String getPersistenceUnit() {
    InputStream inputStream = getClass().getResourceAsStream("/database.properties");

    if (inputStream == null) {
        throw new RuntimeException();
    }

    try {
        Properties properties = new Properties();
        properties.load(inputStream);

        return properties.getProperty("persistenceUnit");
    } catch (IOException e) {
        throw new RuntimeException(e);
    }
}


}

And my ServletModule:

public class DispatchServletModule extends ServletModule {      
  @Override
  public void configureServlets() {
    serve("/" + ActionImpl.DEFAULT_SERVICE_NAME + "*").with(DispatchServiceImpl.class);
  }
}

I've tried adding a filter in configureServlets() instead of starting the persistence session manually in an attempt to use session-per-http-request (per this page) with no luck.

share|improve this question
5  
Well, you should start with giving us ANY information at all... –  Baz Aug 16 '12 at 13:27
    
Agreed... Pressed enter too soon while entering tags. My bad. Give me one moment... –  Jeff Allen Aug 16 '12 at 13:27
1  
Just of curiosity: what is the debugging output tell you? Usually you should see the SQLs executed. Are you sure it is not throwing an Exception that you just catch and silently ignore? –  PepperBob Aug 23 '12 at 17:42
    
I don't have Hibernate's SQL output enabled. I can give that a try to make sure everything's being executed in the proper order. Also, I'm hesitant to think there's any error on the put(), seeing as the database is eventually consistent. So everything's working properly, just not in the right order (in one environment). –  Jeff Allen Aug 23 '12 at 17:57
    
One curious entry: 2012-08-23 13:07:04.510:INFO:oejpw.PlusConfiguration:No Transaction manager found - if your webapp requires one, please configure one. I don't notice this on my other server logs (though I might be missing it). –  Jeff Allen Aug 23 '12 at 18:10

2 Answers 2

First of all, you should probably be rolling back the transaction in your catch block and not ignoring the exception (at least log it). But guice-persist supports the @Transactional annotation, so really you shouldn't need to do manual transaction management at all. See Transactions - google-guice.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Hidden in the "do exception handling" is actually a rollback() call. I'll investigate that link you mention. –  Jeff Allen Aug 16 '12 at 13:44
1  
Just to make sure I understand your comments... are you suggesting that the @Transactional annotation will change the behavior of the code and my fix the issue? Or just be easier to maintain? Would the introduction of the UnitOfWork system be helpful in ensuring that my data gets written back in time? –  Jeff Allen Aug 16 '12 at 13:48
    
@Jeff: I'm not sure it will fix your problem, but it's always easier to do things the right way when you let the library do it for you. Note though that @Transactional needs to be on a method of a class that is injected by Guice. –  Mark Peters Aug 16 '12 at 16:30

Have you looked to close the session associated with the transaction?

public T put(T entity) {
    EntityManager entityManager = entityManager();
    EntityTransaction transaction = entityManager.getTransaction();        
    transaction.begin();
    try {
        entity = entityManager.merge(entity);
        entityManager.persist(entity);
        transaction.commit();

    } catch (Exception e) {
        //do exception handling, including rollback
    } finally {
        entityManager.close();
    }

    return entity;
}

But you can force the transaction to sync with a flush:

public T put(T entity) {
    EntityManager entityManager = entityManager();
    EntityTransaction transaction = entityManager.getTransaction();        
    transaction.begin();
    try {
        entity = entityManager.merge(entity);
        entityManager.persist(entity);
        entityManager.flush();
        transaction.commit();

    } catch (Exception e) {
        //do exception handling, including rollback
    }

    return entity;
}

Regards,

share|improve this answer
    
No luck yet, but I think we might be headed in the right direction... I got an error of EntityManager is closed on one of my put() calls -- it looks like my Provider<EntityManager> is returning used instances of EntityManagers rather than throwing them away and making new ones. Is there a different way I should be creating my EntityManagers? –  Jeff Allen Aug 24 '12 at 13:26
    
It can be useful to the following link: docs.jboss.org/hibernate/entitymanager/3.6/reference/en/… –  Manu Navarro Aug 24 '12 at 13:37
    
Can you be more specific with that link? I didn't see anything of immediate use to the problem. After finding that the EntityManagers were recycled, I realized that perhaps clear()ing the entityManager before returning might solve some of these issues. Indeed, it's now much more stable, but I have to manually clear() each EntityManager at the end of each function. Any ideas on how to work with this? –  Jeff Allen Aug 24 '12 at 15:09

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