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What class should I use?

public class Category
{
    public int Id {get;set;}
    public int IdParent {get;set;}
    public string Title {get;set;}
}
or
public class Category
{
    public int Id {get;set;}
    public Nullable<int> IdParent {get;set;}
    public string Title {get;set;}
}

Take into account that auto increment starts from 1 and category can be without parent category.

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just depends of you, and how do you want to handle where you got no values. You will do something like if != null, or if != defaultValue. Just depende of the use that you want –  Gonzalo.- Aug 16 '12 at 13:33
    
Is there any chance that IdPparent can be NULL? In that case use Nullable! Try describe your question in more detail so we can help you out! –  Haris Aug 16 '12 at 13:33

4 Answers 4

If it can be without a parent, you want nullable.

To make your code more readable, you can do:

public class Category
{
    public int Id {get;set;}
    public int? IdParent {get;set;}
    public string Title {get;set;}
}

(Edit: Also, the class declaration shouldn't have parens)

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The Nullable<int> conveys the intent much better than the use of a default value, so I would definitely use it instead of checking for zero. It also makes the check for nullness required, whereas if you are using a default value you may forget to do the check.

In case you do decide to go with zero as a "no parent", you should define a named constant for it:

public class Category
{
    public const int NoParent = 0;
    public int Id {get;set;}
    public int IdParent {get;set;}
    public string Title {get;set;}
}
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I'm not sure what you're trying to do, but if you want to use this to insert with auto increments you probably want your id to be nullable too.

public class Category
{
    public int? Id { get; set; }
    public int? IdParent { get; set; }
    public string Title { get; set; }
}
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It's more likely that ID must always have a value, but the top level categories won't have parents, so that needs to have some "no value" representation. –  Servy Aug 16 '12 at 13:48
    
Usually, though if you are using this as a model for insertion with dapper and auto incremented ID field (which I do quite a bit), you'll definately want this to be a nullable int. –  Kell Aug 16 '12 at 14:53
    
Most of the DB frameworks I've worked with all auto-generate the data holder classes for you. Doesn't that one? –  Servy Aug 16 '12 at 14:55
    
dapper is a micro-orb created by the stackoverflow guys. Really simple and fast: code.google.com/p/dapper-dot-net –  Kell Aug 16 '12 at 15:14

I would use the second option, because it better communicates the fact that a category can have no parent. With the first option, you need to use a magic value to indicate a missing parent.

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