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I am new to R and to this list. I hope that the question that follows is not too basic or uninformed. I have been checking in the archives for the past few hours to no avail, so here I am posting. Part of the issue is that I don't exactly know the proper terminology to use when refering to the functions that I need, which can make searching difficult. That being said, here is what I need to solve:

I have a data frame that looks like the following:

   Subject Item Region   RT  
13     102    1  R1 1245  
14     102    4  R1 1677  
15     102    7  R1 1730  
25     103    1  R1  815  
26     103    4  R1  828  
27     103    7  R1  985  
1489     102    1  R2 356  
1490     102    4  R2 510  
1491     102    7  R2 544  
1501     103    1  R2 447  
1502     103    4  R2 486  
1503     103    7  R2 221  
...  

Each subject has an RT (reaction time) for multiple regions of one item. And each subject sees multiple items.

I wish to compute outliers and then normalize them (though I'm not really going to worry about that solution in this thread). As a first step, I used some simple functions to compute the mean and SD for each Region for each subject, collapsing across items (i.e, (average of all the RTs that subject has in that region):

Mean = with(test, aggregate(RT, by = list(Subject,Region),mean, na.rm=TRUE))  
SD = with(test, aggregate(RT, by = list(Subject,Region),sd, na.rm=TRUE))  

I then used cbind and did some renaming to get the data all in one dataframe:

Subject Region      Mean         SD  
1       102  R1 1143.7778  202.25530  
2       102  R2  431.8611  125.84393  
9       103  R1  923.0833  179.51098  
10      103  R2  344.1667  146.51192  
...  

The issue is that I now need to associate all of the means with the correct regions for each subject. That is, I would like to generate output that looks like this (note that all Subject 102 Region R1s have the same mean and SD, but different RTs etc.):

Subject Item Region   RT Mean         SD  
13     102    1  R1 1245 1143.7778  202.25530  
14     102    4  R1 1677 1143.7778  202.25530  
15     102    7  R1 1730 1143.7778  202.25530  
25     103    1  R1  815 923.0833  179.51098  
26     103    4  R1  828 923.0833  179.51098  
27     103    7  R1  985 923.0833  179.51098  
1489     102    1  R2 356 431.8611  125.84393   
1490     102    4  R2 510 431.8611  125.84393  
1491     102    7  R2 544 431.8611  125.84393  
1501     103    1  R2 447 344.1667  146.51192  
1502     103    4  R2 486 344.1667  146.51192  
1503     103    7  R2 221 344.1667  146.51192  

It seems that merge and cbind are not going to do the job of extending and matching one value to another. Perhaps I need to make use of melt or some function that uses a key?

I hope that someone can either point me to the relevant function for me to read up on so that I can try this on my own, or just help with some code.

Thanks for reading...

share|improve this question
    
Why do you feel that merge() is not of use here? –  Ananda Mahto Aug 16 '12 at 16:50
    
There's no such thing as a “too basic question“, welcome to the R section of SO! ;-) –  Rappster Aug 17 '12 at 5:15
    
My suspicion that merge() was not relevant was probably unfounded. Perhaps I should have said that I did not understand how to make merge() work to accomplish what I needed. I did just find this link, which seems relevant: stackoverflow.com/questions/4227077/… –  D T Aug 17 '12 at 9:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could accomplish this task using ddply function from plyr package. Using ddply and ave function:

test <- read.table(text="
Subject Item Region   RT  
13     102    1  R1 1245  
14     102    4  R1 1677  
15     102    7  R1 1730  
25     103    1  R1  815  
26     103    4  R1  828  
27     103    7  R1  985  
1489     102    1  R2 356  
1490     102    4  R2 510  
1491     102    7  R2 544  
1501     103    1  R2 447  
1502     103    4  R2 486  
1503     103    7  R2 221", header=T)

library(plyr)
ddply(test, .(Subject, Region), transform, Mean=ave(RT), SD=ave(RT, FUN=sd))
   Subject Item Region   RT      Mean        SD
1      102    1     R1 1245 1550.6667 266.03822
2      102    4     R1 1677 1550.6667 266.03822
3      102    7     R1 1730 1550.6667 266.03822
4      102    1     R2  356  470.0000 100.17984
5      102    4     R2  510  470.0000 100.17984
6      102    7     R2  544  470.0000 100.17984
7      103    1     R1  815  876.0000  94.62029
8      103    4     R1  828  876.0000  94.62029
9      103    7     R1  985  876.0000  94.62029
10     103    1     R2  447  384.6667 143.07457
11     103    4     R2  486  384.6667 143.07457
12     103    7     R2  221  384.6667 143.07457

You can check the results using aggregate function as you already did.

> with(test, aggregate(RT, by = list(Subject,Region),mean, na.rm=TRUE))  
  Group.1 Group.2         x
1     102      R1 1550.6667
2     103      R1  876.0000
3     102      R2  470.0000
4     103      R2  384.6667
> with(test, aggregate(RT, by = list(Subject,Region),sd, na.rm=TRUE))
  Group.1 Group.2         x
1     102      R1 266.03822
2     103      R1  94.62029
3     102      R2 100.17984
4     103      R2 143.07457

As you can see both the mean and the sd aggregated by Subject and Region are put into your data.frame (test).

EDIT

If you want to deal with NA, you may want to use the following edited code:

ddply(test, .(Subject, Region), transform, 
      Mean=ave(RT, FUN = function(x) mean(x, na.rm=TRUE)),
      SD=ave(RT, FUN=function(x) sd(x, na.rm=TRUE)))
share|improve this answer
    
Hello Jiber - thank you for suggesting plyr. This seems to be working very well with my full data set. One additional question: for the computation of the mean, which is now nested within ddply, is it defaulting to na.rm-TRUE? –  D T Aug 17 '12 at 10:00
    
Hello @user1603288 you can see the edit in my answer, I added a way that allows you to deal with the 'NA' –  Jilber Aug 17 '12 at 21:32
    
@Jiber. Thank you - using ave() is new to me, but your example makes sense. Much appreciated. –  D T Aug 18 '12 at 6:56

This can be done usng sqldf

df1<-read.table(header=T,text="Subject Item Region   RT  
13     102    1  R1 1245  
14     102    4  R1 1677  
15     102    7  R1 1730  
25     103    1  R1  815  
26     103    4  R1  828  
27     103    7  R1  985  
1489     102    1  R2 356  
1490     102    4  R2 510  
1491     102    7  R2 544  
1501     103    1  R2 447  
1502     103    4  R2 486  
1503     103    7  R2 221")

df2<-read.table(header=T,text="Subject Region      Mean         SD  
1       102  R1 1143.7778  202.25530  
2       102  R2  431.8611  125.84393  
9       103  R1  923.0833  179.51098  
10      103  R2  344.1667  146.51192")  

library(sqldf)
sqldf("SELECT df1.*,df2.Mean,df2.SD from df1,df2
        WHERE df1.Region=df2.Region 
         GROUP BY df1.Region,df1.Subject,df1.Item")

#   Subject Item Region   RT      Mean       SD
#1      102    1     R1 1245 1143.7778 202.2553
#2      102    4     R1 1677 1143.7778 202.2553
#3      102    7     R1 1730 1143.7778 202.2553
#4      103    1     R1  815 1143.7778 202.2553
#5      103    4     R1  828 1143.7778 202.2553
#6      103    7     R1  985 1143.7778 202.2553
#7      102    1     R2  356  431.8611 125.8439
#8      102    4     R2  510  431.8611 125.8439
#9      102    7     R2  544  431.8611 125.8439
#10     103    1     R2  447  431.8611 125.8439
#11     103    4     R2  486  431.8611 125.8439
#12     103    7     R2  221  431.8611 125.8439

it is ordered by Region, Subject then Item

share|improve this answer
    
This also looks good, thank you! –  D T Aug 17 '12 at 10:37

You were, like, 99% done with your work. The only thing you needed to do was "pretty up" your aggregate() output so that it works more politely with merge(). Note that in the following, you're specifying the output column names so that they can easily be merged.

Then, we use Reduce() to recursively merge.

Mean = with(test, aggregate(list(mean = RT), 
                            by = list(Subject = Subject, Region = Region), 
                            mean, na.rm=TRUE))
SD = with(test, aggregate(list(sd = RT), 
                          by = list(Subject = Subject, Region = Region), 
                          sd, na.rm=TRUE))
Reduce(function(x, y) merge(x, y), list(test, Mean, SD))
#    Subject Region Item   RT      mean        sd
# 1      102     R1    1 1245 1550.6667 266.03822
# 2      102     R1    4 1677 1550.6667 266.03822
# 3      102     R1    7 1730 1550.6667 266.03822
# 4      102     R2    1  356  470.0000 100.17984
# 5      102     R2    4  510  470.0000 100.17984
# 6      102     R2    7  544  470.0000 100.17984
# 7      103     R1    1  815  876.0000  94.62029
# 8      103     R1    4  828  876.0000  94.62029
# 9      103     R1    7  985  876.0000  94.62029
# 10     103     R2    1  447  384.6667 143.07457
# 11     103     R2    4  486  384.6667 143.07457
# 12     103     R2    7  221  384.6667 143.07457
# merge(merge(test, Mean), SD)
share|improve this answer
    
Hi mrdwab. Thank you for your suggestion, and for attempting to work with what I had thus far. This may be quite simple, but I don't quite understand what is going on in this part of your code: (list(mean = RT). did you possibly mean (list(mean, RT)??? The rest however, seems fairly clear, at least for now. –  D T Aug 17 '12 at 10:48
    
@user1603288, list(mean = RT) means to make a column named mean. Perhaps it would have been less confusing if I named it Mean since there is a function named mean(). If you don't specify the column name (in a list, like I did here) the result would look like Jilber's aggregate() example, where the columns are named Group.1, Group.2, and x. Hence my suggestion to "pretty up" your aggregate() output. –  Ananda Mahto Aug 17 '12 at 10:53
    
@mrwab. I did understand that you were assigning names within the aggregate function (if I can state it like that), which is all quite clear with the Subject and Region list components. But I'm still struggling to understand why you assign RT to "mean" (or "Mean", as you suggest). Just to be clear, can I understand this syntax as "operate the mean function on the column test in RT (by Subject and Region) and then assign it the name "mean"? That is certainly what it seems to be doing, but I want to make sure I get exactly what is going on here. Thanks! –  D T Aug 17 '12 at 11:26
    
I meant: "operate the mean function on the column "RT" in the data frame "test" (by Subject and Region) and then assign it the name "mean"? –  D T Aug 17 '12 at 11:32
    
@user1603288, Yes. Your interpretation is correct. You can aggregate more than one column at a time by adding them to this first list. For example (silly example), suppose you wanted to take the mean of RT (in a column named "Mean.RT") and the mean of Item (in a column named ("Mean.Item"), you would do this: list(Mean.RT = test$RT, Mean.Item = test$Item). If you didn't assign the output column names, you'd end up with some horrible column names. Try it out and see. –  Ananda Mahto Aug 17 '12 at 11:42

It's kind of brute force, but it works

test <- data.frame(Subject=rep(c(102,103),2,each=3), Item=rep(c(1,4,7),4),Region=rep(c("R1","R2"),each=6), RT= c(1245,1677,1730,815,828,985,356,510,544,447,486,221))

Mean = with(test, aggregate(RT, by = list(Subject,Region),mean, na.rm=TRUE))  
SD = with(test, aggregate(RT, by = list(Subject,Region),sd, na.rm=TRUE))  

aa <- data.frame(test, Mean=0, SD=0)

for (i in 1:nrow(aa)) {
  for(j in 1:nrow(Mean)){
    if (aa$Subject[i]==Mean$Group.1[j] & aa$Region[i]==Mean$Group.2[j]) aa$Mean[i] <- Mean$x[j]
    if (aa$Subject[i]==SD$Group.1[j] & aa$Region[i]==SD$Group.2[j]) aa$SD[i] <- SD$x[j]
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your suggestion Rub. The other approaches are probably easier, given that I have a larger number of subjects and items than I indicated above. I am hoping to build up a routine that is more general so that I can apply it to lots of data. But I will still look this over so that I can learn more how to think this through. –  D T Aug 17 '12 at 10:51

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