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Let's say you have a simple class like:

class Box
  def initialize
    @widgets = []
  end

  def add_widget(widget)
    @widgets << widget
  end

  def widgets
    @widgets
  end
end

I would write a test which looks something like this:

describe Box do
  describe "#initialize" do
    it "creates an empty box"
      Box.new.widgets.should == []
    end
  end

  describe "#add_widget" do
    it "adds a widget to the box"
      widget = stub('widget')
      box = Box.new
      box.add_widget(widget)
      box.widgets.should == [widget]
    end
  end

  describe "#widgets" do
    it "returns the list of widgets"
      widget = stub('widget')
      box = Box.new
      box.add_widget(widget)
      box.widgets.should == [widget]
    end
  end
end

Note how the last two tests end up being identical. I'm struggling with how to avoid these overlapping cases. I'm implicitly testing #widgets in the first two cases but I feel there should be also be an explicit test. However, the code for this ends up being identical to the 2nd case.

If a class has 3 public methods then I would expect at least one test corresponding to each of those methods. Am I wrong?

UPDATE

I found this article by Ron Jeffries which advises against testing simple accessors.

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3 Answers 3

I'm not sure you, at least in this case, that you can avoid code duplication. Where you do not have a constructor that takes an array of widgets, you have to use one method to test the other either way. The one way you could alter your tests in this case could be the following:

describe Box do
  describe "#initialize" do
    it "creates an empty box"
      Box.new.widgets.should == []
    end
  end

  describe "#add_widget" do
    before do
      @widget = stub('widget')
      @box = Box.new
      @box.add_widget(@widget)
    end

    it "adds a widget to the box, which gets returned by #widgets"
      @box.widgets.should == [@widget]
    end
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but although that's shorter, the #add_widget and #widgets test cases are still identical. –  Andy Waite Aug 16 '12 at 14:08
    
@AndyWaite: I see what you are getting at now, I'll update my answer –  Dan McClain Aug 16 '12 at 14:10
    
It seems that your revised version only contains 2 tests, with the second now combining the #add_widget and #widgets tests. I think this is a perfectly reasonably approach, but it would be nice to get some other views. –  Andy Waite Aug 16 '12 at 15:17

This is very simple case and as you said probably you shouldn't accessors like that. But in case the case is a little bit more complex, or the accessor is not really an accessor but it has some logic inside and you really really want to test it then you could use instance_variable_get and instance_variable_set of Object.

describe Box do
  describe "#initialize" do
    it "creates an empty box" do
      Box.new.widgets.should == []
    end
  end

  describe "#add_widget" do
    it "adds a widget to the box" do
      widget = stub('widget')
      box = Box.new
      box.add_widget(widget)
      box.instance_variable_get(:@widgets).should == [widget]
    end
  end

  describe "#widgets" do
    it "returns the list of widgets" do
      widget = stub('widget')
      box = Box.new
      box.instance_variable_set(:@widgets, [widget])
      box.widgets.should == [widget]
    end
  end
end

But, I guess it's not very good testing technique since you are interfering with internal state of an object so whenever the internal implementation changes, you have to make sure that the test is changed even though public interface of that class did not change.

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1  
+1 for mentioning that you shouldn't test accessors in most cases –  guillaume31 Aug 17 '12 at 7:34
    
Piotr is completely right that when you want to be totally virtuous about testing individual methods, you need test them in isolation, that is, to create a testing double of the tested class with all the methods removed or replaced by testing methods, and only the method(s) being tested left, and in this artificial testing environment, they should behave as expected. –  Boris Stitnicky Aug 17 '12 at 11:47

Perhaps it is the test being vocal? And if it is and it was me listening, I'd hear something along those lines: "Dude, stop testing methods. It is the behavior that matters.". To which I'd respond with the following:

describe Box do
  it "contains widgets" do
    widget = stub('widget')
    box    = Box.new

    box.add_widget(widget)
    box.widgets.should == [widget]
  end

  it "has no widgets by default" do
    Box.new.widgets.should == []
  end
end

Since #widgets is the only (public) way to access box widgets and #add_widget is the only way to add them, there is no other way to test Box behavior, but to exercise them both.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I think the problem is I'm trying too much for a direct mapping between the implementation's public methods and the test cases. It should be more fluid. Many articles on RSpec seem to promote the convention of having the method name (#foo or .bar) within the test name but perhaps this is a bad practice... –  Andy Waite Aug 17 '12 at 10:39
    
@Andy No no, I understand you well. Your soul wants to be sure that you are honest about TDD before you start feeling the need to omit tests that are too simple. –  Boris Stitnicky Aug 17 '12 at 11:41

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