Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to find "codes" in a text, these codes can contain letters and numbers and could have a different length. A text could look like this:

This is a example text, it contains different codes like this one 8de96217e0fd4c61a8aa7e70b3eb68 or that one a7ac356448437db693b5ed6125348.

How can I find and echo them in the correct order (from the first to the last one). I think there is a way with prey_match(), but I don't know how to make regular expressions. Additional information: the codes are all about 30 characters long and contain only lower letters and numbers.

Any help is really appreciated. Thank you!

share|improve this question

closed as off-topic by Gene T, vstm, stema, HamZa, andrewsi Mar 1 at 0:34

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – stema, HamZa
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
preg_match operates on patterns. if you don't have a pattern, then you might need prey_match() indeed. do you know what the codes might be like i.e. are more than 25 characters etc? –  Kasia Gogolek Aug 16 '12 at 14:22
    
Here's a regex tutorial. –  Matt Aug 16 '12 at 14:22
1  
Can you define what the codes are more definitively? One way to do this would be to explode the string into words using space, and then omit words that are just made up of characters or punctuation. –  andrewsi Aug 16 '12 at 14:22
1  
Those look like md5 hashes, are they all 32 long? –  WouterH Aug 16 '12 at 14:23
    
@WouterH they look like md5 hashes but they're not exactly 32 chars long –  ph3nx Aug 16 '12 at 14:24

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted
preg_match_all("/[a-z0-9]{25,}/", $text, $matches);
print_r($matches);

Simple but should work for your case.

Output:

Array
(
    [0] => Array
        (
            [0] => 8de96217e0fd4c61a8aa7e70b3eb68
            [1] => a7ac356448437db693b5ed6125348
        )

)
share|improve this answer
    
this is the best answer, shouldnt be on bottom of the page. upping. –  alpera Aug 16 '12 at 14:30
    
Wouldn't that match any word made up of letters or numbers? –  andrewsi Aug 16 '12 at 14:30
    
Yes. This matches ALL words. –  Matt Razza Aug 16 '12 at 14:32
    
I think this is the right way, but it matches with every word not only with number-and-letter words. –  ph3nx Aug 16 '12 at 14:32
1  
pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism –  Matt Razza Aug 16 '12 at 14:37

You can use this code:

$string = "This is a example text, it contains different codes like this one 8de96217e0fd4c61a8aa7e70b3eb68 or that one a7ac356448437db693b5ed6125348."
preg_match_all("/[0-9a-z]{30,}/", $string, $matches)

Where $matches is an array containing all matches. You can adjust the {30,} to a higher or lower number if you'd like. That's just the number of consecutive characters.

share|improve this answer

basicly,

$words = explode($text);
foreach($words as $word)
{
  if(strlen($word)==30)
    echo $word;
}

if you want to eliminate letters like #+$*... you should use regex

edit: Forlan07's answer is obviously better.

share|improve this answer
    
From OP: codes can contain letters and numbers and could have a different length. –  Matt Aug 16 '12 at 14:25
1  
What about the word pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism? :p –  Thomas Clayson Aug 16 '12 at 14:26
    
pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism :) –  alpera Aug 16 '12 at 14:29

If your requirement is that the "hashes" have both letters and numbers you could try something similar to this:

$string = "This is a example text, it contains different codes like this one 8de96217e0fd4c61a8aa7e70b3eb68 or that one a7ac356448437db693b5ed6125348.";

$words = explode(" ", $string);
$hashes = array();

foreach ($words as $currWord)
{
    $hasLetter = false;
    $hasNumber = false;

    for ($index = 0; $index < strlen($currWord); $index++)
    {
        if (ctype_alpha($string[$index]))
            $hasLetter = true;
        else
            $hasNumber = true;
    }

    if ($hasLetter && $hasNumber)
        $hashes[] = $currWord;
}
share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.