Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I am using mysql and I have three tables T1, T2, T3 they contain data as follows:

+-------+
| t1.id |
+-------+
| 1    |
| 2    |
| 3    |
| 4    |
| 5    |
+------+

+-------+
| t2.id |
+-------+
| 1    |
| 2    |
| 3    |
| 4    |
+-------+

+-------+
| t3.id |
+-------+
| 1    |
| 2    |
| 3    |
+-------+

    I want to be able to select data as follows:

id      t1.id   t2.id   t3.id
1       1       1       1
2       2       2       2
3       3       3       3
4       4       4       null
5       5       null    null

How can I do this?

share|improve this question
    
What happens to 5 from t1.id? –  Kermit Aug 16 '12 at 14:26
    
there is no gurantee that one of the tables will have greater number of rows than other. We can very well have 5 ids in T2 and only 3 in T1 –  sachin Aug 16 '12 at 14:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted
SELECT t1.id, t2.id, t3.id
FROM t1 
LEFT JOIN t2 ON t1.id=t2.id
LEFT JOIN t3 ON t1.id=t3.id

works, if t1 is guaranteed to have a strict superset of all ids.

If not, you would need a helper table:

SELECT th.id,t1.id, t2.id, t3.id
FROM (
  SELECT id FROM t1
  UNION DISTINCT 
  SELECT id FROM t2
  UNION DISTINCT 
  SELECT id FROM t3
) AS th
LEFT JOIN t1 ON th.id=t1.id
LEFT JOIN t2 ON th.id=t2.id
LEFT JOIN t3 ON th.id=t3.id
share|improve this answer
    
@awesome, thanks a lot! –  sachin Aug 16 '12 at 14:50

Assuming you intend to use T1 as the base id, a pair of LEFT JOINs will give you your desired result:

SELECT 
  /* base id */
  T1.id AS id,
  /* Redundant t1.id */
  T1.id AS t1_id,
  T2.id AS t2_id,
  T3.id AS t3_id
FROM
  T1
  LEFT JOIN T2 ON T1.id = T2.id
  LEFT JOIN T3 ON T1.id = T3.id

Note that this makes redundant use of T1.id, but that's exactly what you have in your suggested output so I duplicated it here.

If what you really want is to take all possible ids from all tables, use a UNION to join against. This will combine the distinct set of ids from the three tables into a subquery allids used as a base id to LEFT JOIN each of the other three tables against. If a particular id exists in T2 but not T1 then, it will still appear in the output.

SELECT 
  allids.id AS id,
  T1.id AS t1_id,
  T2.id AS t2_id,
  T3.id AS t3_id
FROM
  ( SELECT id FROM T1 UNION SELECT id FROM T2 UNION SELECT id FROM T3 ORDER BY id) allids
  LEFT JOIN T1 ON allids.id = T1.id
  LEFT JOIN T2 ON allids.id = T2.id
  LEFT JOIN T3 ON allids.id = T3.id
share|improve this answer

I think the solution you want involves full outer join:

SELECT coalesce(t1.id, t2.id, t3.id) as id,
       T1.id as t1_id, T2.id as t2_id, T3.id as t3_id
FROM T1 full outer JOIN
     T2 ON T2.id = T1.id full outer JOIN
     T3 ON T3.id = coalesce(t1.id, t2.id)

I propose the full outer join, in case there are ids in the other two tables that are not in T1. You didn't specify that t1 is the driving table.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.