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How do I do the following with std::cout?

double my_double = 42.0;
char str[12];
printf_s("%11.6lf", my_double); // Prints " 42.000000"

I am just about ready to give up and use sprintf_s.

More generally, where can I find a reference on std::ostream formatting that lists everything in one place, rather than spreading it all out in a long tutorial?

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The format specifier for printf should be "%11.6f". There's no "lf" format specifier, and "Lf" would be for long double. –  Pete Becker Aug 16 '12 at 14:34
    
@pete - Well you learn something every day. I have been using %lf for 28 years. –  Jive Dadson Aug 16 '12 at 14:51
    
@Pete @Jive: There is nothing wrong with using %lf; the l is simply ignored according to the standard. See pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799/functions/printf.html, or your favorite C spec. –  Nemo Aug 16 '12 at 14:54
    
@JiveDadson - don't want to go to far off on this tangent, but is that with the same compiler, or spread across various ones? –  Pete Becker Aug 16 '12 at 14:55
    
@pete Everything from the PCC ca. 1984 to VC++ 2010 about five minutes ago. –  Jive Dadson Aug 16 '12 at 14:57
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4 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted
std::cout << std::fixed << std::setw( 11 ) << std::setprecision( 6 ) << my_double;

You need to add

#include <iomanip>

You need stream manipulators

You may "fill" the empty places with whatever char you want. Like this:

std::cout << std::fixed << std::setw( 11 ) << std::setprecision( 6 ) 
          << std::setfill( '0' ) << my_double;
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Which ones? Where do I put the 11 and where do I put the 6? –  Jive Dadson Aug 16 '12 at 14:47
    
To match the original format specifier this also needs std::setw(11). And as a side note, for the specific case of a precision of 6, you don't need to say it, neither in C nor C++, because it's the default. –  Pete Becker Aug 16 '12 at 14:51
    
@JiveDadson - sorry, I missed the 11. Edited. –  Kiril Kirov Aug 16 '12 at 15:02
    
@PeteBecker - thanks for the remark! –  Kiril Kirov Aug 16 '12 at 15:03
    
Should be std::setfill(' '). –  Jive Dadson Aug 16 '12 at 22:41
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std::cout << boost::format("%11.6f") % my_double;

You have to #include <boost\format.hpp>

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I remember I used to use that long ago on a project far, far away. Thanks for reminding me. I wish I could use boost for what I am working on, but alas... –  Jive Dadson Aug 16 '12 at 14:53
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#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>

int main() {
    double my_double = 42.0;
    std::cout << std::fixed << std::setw(11)
        << std::setprecision(6) << my_double << std::endl;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Not quite what I need. Maybe I asked the question wrong. I want it always to print 11 characters, no more, no less. When I give that 0.1, it prints "0.100000" which is only 8 characters. –  Jive Dadson Aug 16 '12 at 15:08
    
@JiveDadson - works fine for me. When I give that 0.1 it prints " 0.100000", which is 11 characters. (Note that there are three leading spaces in the actual output; they seem to have gotten swallowed in word wrapping. –  Pete Becker Aug 16 '12 at 15:15
    
Note that setw(11) does not set the output to be exactly 11 characters. It sets the field width to be at least 11 characters. E.g., printing 42e5 with this format produces 14 characters. –  Eric Postpischil Aug 16 '12 at 15:19
    
This is driving me bonkers. It's so easy with printf, and so short. I might just have to rip off boost/format, as Andrey suggested. I have despised iostreams since the first day they were introduced. I have fought this battle a lot of times, but I always forget the devilish details. –  Jive Dadson Aug 16 '12 at 15:23
    
@EricPostpischil - right. Same thing for %11.6f". –  Pete Becker Aug 16 '12 at 15:23
show 10 more comments

In general, you want to avoid specifying things like 11 and 6 at the point of output. That's physical markup, and you want logical markup; e.g. pressure, or volume. That way, you define in a single place how pressure or volume are formatted, and if that formatting changes, you don't have to search through out the program to find where to change the format (and accidentally change the format of something else). In C++, you do this by defining a manipulator, which sets the various formatting options, and preferrably restores them at the end of the full expression. So you end up writing things like:

std::cout << pressure << my_double;

Although I definitly wouldn't use it in production code, I've found the following FFmt formatter useful for quicky jobs:

class FFmt : public StateSavingManip
{
public:
    explicit            FFmt(
                            int                 width,
                            int                 prec = 6,
                            std::ios::fmtflags  additionalFlags 
                                    = static_cast<std::ios::fmtflags>(),
                            char                fill = ' ' );

protected:
    virtual void        setState( std::ios& targetStream ) const;

private:
    int                 myWidth;
    int                 myPrec;
    std::ios::fmtflags  myFlags;
    char                myFill;
};

FFmt::FFmt(
    int                 width,
    int                 prec,
    std::ios::fmtflags  additionalFlags,
    char                fill )
    :   myWidth( width )
    ,   myPrec( prec )
    ,   myFlags( additionalFlags )
    ,   myFill( fill )
{
    myFlags &= ~ std::ios::floatfield
    myFlags |= std::ios::fixed
    if ( isdigit( static_cast< unsigned char >( fill ) )
             && (myFlags & std::ios::adjustfield) == 0 ) {
        myFlags |= std::ios::internal
    }
}

void
FFmt::setState( 
    std::ios&           targetStream ) const
{
    targetStream.flags( myFlags )
    targetStream.width( myWidth )
    targetStream.precision( myPrec )
    targetStream.fill( myFill )
}

This allows writing things like:

std::cout << FFmt( 11, 6 ) << my_double;

And for the record:

class StateSavingManip
{
public:
    StateSavingManip( 
            StateSavingManip const& other );
    virtual             ~StateSavingManip();
    void                operator()( std::ios& stream ) const;

protected:
    StateSavingManip();

private:
    virtual void        setState( std::ios& stream ) const = 0;

private:
    StateSavingManip&   operator=( StateSavingManip const& );

private:
    mutable std::ios*   myStream;
    mutable std::ios::fmtflags
                        mySavedFlags;
    mutable int         mySavedPrec;
    mutable char        mySavedFill;
};

inline std::ostream&
operator<<(
    std::ostream&       out,
    StateSavingManip const&
                        manip )
{
    manip( out );
    return out;
}

inline std::istream&
operator>>(
    std::istream&       in,
    StateSavingManip const&
                        manip )
{
    manip( in );
    return in;
}

StateSavingManip.cc:

namespace {

//      We maintain the value returned by ios::xalloc() + 1, and not
//      the value itself.  The actual value may be zero, and we need
//      to be able to distinguish it from the 0 resulting from 0
//      initialization.  The function getXAlloc() returns this value
//      -1, so we add one in the initialization.
int                 getXAlloc();
int                 ourXAlloc = getXAlloc() + 1;

int
getXAlloc()
{
    if ( ourXAlloc == 0 ) {
        ourXAlloc = std::ios::xalloc() + 1;
        assert( ourXAlloc != 0 );
    }
    return ourXAlloc - 1;
}
}

StateSavingManip::StateSavingManip()
    :   myStream( NULL )
{
}

StateSavingManip::StateSavingManip(
    StateSavingManip const&
                        other )
{
    assert( other.myStream == NULL );
}

StateSavingManip::~StateSavingManip()
{
    if ( myStream != NULL ) {
        myStream->flags( mySavedFlags );
        myStream->precision( mySavedPrec );
        myStream->fill( mySavedFill );
        myStream->pword( getXAlloc() ) = NULL;
    }
}

void
StateSavingManip::operator()( 
    std::ios&           stream ) const
{
    void*&              backptr = stream.pword( getXAlloc() );
    if ( backptr == NULL ) {
        backptr      = const_cast< StateSavingManip* >( this );
        myStream     = &stream;
        mySavedFlags = stream.flags();
        mySavedPrec  = stream.precision();
        mySavedFill  = stream.fill();
    }
    setState( stream );
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's some mighty nice stuff, and I thank you. To everybody: I have to leave for a while. Thanks for all the help. It appears there is no perfect answer, but I have learned a lot, and even remembered some things I had forgotten. When I get back I will struggle with where to put the green check mark. –  Jive Dadson Aug 16 '12 at 16:15
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