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We are developing a new interrupt system (in c++), to replace the old inconsistant one.

It works like this:

  1. A programmer who wants to make his method interruptable accepts a BreakFlag object as an argument to the method.

  2. At points during the method the programmer checks break_flag.is_set(), and exits and tidies up if it is.

We want to be able te test that all the orginal calls to break_flag.is_set() remain in the same order, after some change is made to the program. (We count multiple calls in the same loop as one call, so that two operations of different size appear to be the same)

Our first approach was to use the call stack to identify each instance. For example in the code:

void A(BreakFlag& flag) {
  flag.is_set();
  B(flag);
  C(flag);
}

void B(BreakFlag& flag) {
  flag.is_set();
  C(flag);
}

void C(BreakFlag& flag) {
  flag.is_set();
}

We would look at the call stack each time is_set is called and generate the following sequence for this method:

A
A, B
A, B, C
A, C

We could then use this to check that this sequence of checks occers every time we test the program, so that somebody could not come along and do this:

void A(BreakFlag& flag) { flag.is_set(); B(flag); C(flag); }

void B(BreakFlag& flag) {
  flag.is_set();
  //C(flag); // I HAVE COMMENTED THIS OUT BECAUSE I DONT LIKE FLAG!
}

void C(BreakFlag& flag) {
  flag.is_set();
}

Because it would result in the sequence:

A
A, B
A, C

Which would not match our original.

The problem that we have, is that the compiler sometimes optomizes in such a way that the call stack changes, which causes our proposed system to register a false failed test since the call stack is not what it is expecting, even though it is correct.

We could solve it by doing something similar to the following:

#define CHECK_FLAG(x) actually_check_flag(__LINE__,__FILE__,x)

Which would allow us to essentially ID each instance in code.

Other than that we cant think of any way to ID each call to .is_set that wont change in optomized code, can you?

share|improve this question
1  
honestly the macro approach is the simplest and most portable - it's not obvious what you expect to gain from an alternative? – Useless Aug 16 '12 at 14:47
    
i wonder if you could actually do this check at compile time using some template tricks – Gir Aug 16 '12 at 14:50
    
We were simply hoping that there would be some alternative we were not aware of. Macros are acceptable, but we would prefer not to have to use them if possible. – sji Aug 16 '12 at 14:53
    
oh, and how about adding a comment to C(flag) that says that it is forbidden to remove it? – Gir Aug 16 '12 at 14:56
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use RAII to maintain a call stack manually. On entry to each function construct a guard object:

void B(BreakFlag& flag) {
    BreakFlagStackGuard guard(flag, "B");
    flag.is_set();
    C(flag);
}

The constructor of BreakFlagStackGuard pushes the function name "B" onto a flag.stack, while the destructor ~BreakFlagStackGuard() (which will be called when B returns) pops it.

Whatever the compiler does to optimise it will need to respect your guard objects so you can guarantee that the observed call stack reflects the source code.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah that would work, i don't think it offers a better solution to us than the macro, since each programmer would have to add the Guard line to each function. But it does answer the question. If nothing better comes up I will accept this. – sji Aug 16 '12 at 15:05

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