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I'm using MySQL (nobody's perfect), version 4.1 and I'm used to define some timestamp columns like that:

ALTER TABLE foo ADD creation TIMESTAMP DEFAULT NOW() ;

I'd like to do exactly the same thing, but for a DATE field. The reason being I don't need a TIMESTAMP precision and since no functional index exists in MySQL, I cannot access quickly to the rows with a given date (regardless of time of day). So I tried the following but it just does not work:

ALTER TABLE foo ADD creation_date DATE DEFAULT CURDATE() ;
ERROR 1067 (42000): Invalid default value for 'creation_date'

Or even

ALTER TABLE foo ADD creation_date DATE DEFAULT DATE(NOW()) ;
ERROR 1064 (42000): You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near '(now())' at line 1

Which does not work either.

Any Ideas?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In MySQL default values have to be constant. Functions or expressions are not allowed.

The exception ist the TIMESTAMP type, for which CURRENT_TIMESTAMP is a valid non constant default value.

See 4.1 manual: Data Type Default Values

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Hum, so there's no pure MySQL solution for 4.1? –  jeje Jul 29 '09 at 9:45
    
Set the date using CURDATE() when you INSERT or UPDATE the row. –  port-zero Jul 29 '09 at 14:12
    
Yep.. client side solution :( –  jeje Jul 31 '09 at 10:09
    
You could set a trigger to update the field after an insert. –  jeffery_the_wind Jun 18 '12 at 15:25

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