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I have run the following code through VS2010.

#include <iostream>

template<class T> // (a) a base template 
void f( T )
{    std::cout << "(a)" << std::endll;}

template<class T> // (b) a second base template, overloads (a) 
void f( T* )     //     (function templates can't be partially 
{    std::cout << "(b)" << std::endll;}

template<>        // (c) explicit specialization of (b) 
void f<>(int*)
{    std::cout << "(c)" << std::endll;}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    int *p = new int(10); 
    f( p ); // '(c)'

    return 0;
}

/////////////////

#include <iostream>

template<class T> // (a) same old base template as before 
void f( T )
{    std::cout << "(a)" << std::endll;}

template<>        // (c) explicit specialization, this time of (a)
void f<>(int*)
{    std::cout << "(c)" << std::endll;}

template<class T> // (b) a second base template, overloads (a) 
void f( T* )
{    std::cout << "(b)" << std::endll;}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    int *p = new int(10); 
    f( p ); // '(b)'

    return 0;
}

The output result is (c). However, if I move the block of (c) code in front of (b), then the output result is (b). I have read the related article http://www.gotw.ca/publications/mill17.htm here. Still get confused.

Why the order of the code matters in the case?

share|improve this question
1  
In the second case, why do you think (c) is a specialization of (b)? If it is, then how come the specialization comes before the primary template? – Nawaz Aug 16 '12 at 15:07
    
In any event, the PS should be template <> void f<int>(int*). I have a suspicion that you have a plain ill-formed program. – Kerrek SB Aug 16 '12 at 15:08
    
@Nawaz, that is not my comment and it is from Herb Sutter – q0987 Aug 16 '12 at 16:01
1  
@q0987: Herb Sutter cannot make that mistake (not at least in the published article). Check it out again. You've copied it incorrectly! (Note: I'm talking about the second case.) – Nawaz Aug 16 '12 at 16:25
    
@Nawaz, you are right. I didn't copy the comments from the second block of the original article correctly. I have updated my post. thank you – q0987 Aug 16 '12 at 16:31

I think that you have most of the information already in the question. The problem is that there are two base templates that are overloads and otherwise unrelated.

If the specialization is performed when only the first of them is declared, then the compiler will consider that to be an specialization of the first template for T == int*. Now, after both templates have been declared, when you perform the call, the compiler will only look at the base templates, and determine that the second one is a better match for the expression. The second template has no specializations, and thus the base template definition is used.

Let me emphasize that: template specializations only come into play after their base template has been selected. They don't affect which base template the compiler will pick.

If you move the specialization to after the second template is declared, the compiler is matching that specialization with the second base template with T == int. In this case, when the compiler selects that second template as the best match for the call in main the specialization will kick in and you will get the specialized behavior.

share|improve this answer

As explained in the article, when you move the specialization, it changes which function is being specialized. When you put the specialization before (b), it specializes (a).

template<>        // (c) explicit specialization of (a) <-- here
void f<>(int*)
{    cout << "(c)" << endl;}

In both cases, when you invoke f(p), the first thing the compiler does is look at (a) and (b), and determine which overload is a better fit. As explained by the article you listed, specializations do not participate in overload resolution, and so in both examples, it picks (b). At that point it looks for any specializations for (b).

In the first case, since you have specialized (b) with (c), it executes (c). In the second case, since you have not specialized (b), it executes (b).

Edit: The simplest way to prevent the order from mattering is to forward declare both (a) and (b) prior to providing the specialization. In that case, the compiler is able to deduce what you intended. See http://ideone.com/qj2JC

share|improve this answer
    
So basically if you said template <> f<int>(int*), you'd explicitly specialize the second template, and template <> f<int*>(int*) would specialize the first... leaving out the argument is just asking for trouble. – Kerrek SB Aug 16 '12 at 15:38
    
@Dave, still comes to my original Q, the code is exactly same. the only difference is the order. it surprises me that the compiler picks different one simply b/c the order is changed. – q0987 Aug 16 '12 at 16:11
    
@q0987: Well, when you declare (c), if the compiler isn't yet aware of (b), the best match for the function to specializes is (a). You can get the same problem in regular overloading in the same case. – Dave S Aug 16 '12 at 16:35

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