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I have a wcf service which exposes a function that returns a complex type as its return type. This response type in turn contains another complex object defined by me. I am looking at creating data contracts for my WCF and am wondering how this is supposed to be done. I currently have this (some properties removed for ease of reading):

The Function

///<summary>
/// Interface to describe a cluster query WCF service.
///</summary>
[ServiceContract]
public interface IClusterQueryWcfService
{
    /// <summary>
    /// A method to retrieve the name of the necessary cluster table for a given zoom level, feature type and user type. 
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="zoom">Integer value representing zoom level</param>
    /// <param name="featureType">The feature type string</param>
    /// <param name="user">User name</param>
    /// <returns>RwolTableType made up of table name and table type.(See documentation)</returns>
    [OperationContract]
    TableTypeResponse GetClusterTableForZoom(int zoom, string featureType, string user);

Response Type

/// <summary>
/// The data contract for a TableTypeResponse object
/// </summary>
[DataContract]
public class TableTypeResponse
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Property to manipulate the date and time of the method call.
    /// </summary>
    [DataMember]
    public string DateTimeOfCall
    {
        get;
        set;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Property to get/set the StandardResponse type object included with a TableTypeResponse instance.
    /// </summary>
    [DataMember]
    public StandardResponseType StandardResponse
    {
        get;
        set;
    }
}

Nested Type

/// <summary>
/// Data contract for a StandardResponseType object
/// </summary>
[DataContract]
public class StandardResponseType
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Property to manipulate the date and time of the method call.
    /// </summary>
    [DataMember]
    public string DateTimeOfCall
    {
        get;
        set;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Property to allow get and set of a message to provide more information to the user.
    /// </summary>
    [DataMember]
    public string Message
    {
        get;
        set;
    }
}

Is this code enough to make sure that the calling client knows the structure of the Standard response type held within the initial Response type? By which I mean will the data contract for the nested type actually be observed?

I should add I am fairly new to using data contracts as previously I knew I had .net both sides.

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1  
Why don't you try it out by creating a test client? –  decyclone Aug 16 '12 at 15:06

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes, you can have DataContracts made up of DataContracts. WCF will know how to serialize them properly.

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So in theory you could have any number of nested types within types? Provided you provide a data contract for the individual classes until you have defined all of the possible types and wcf will know how to serialize/deserialize them? –  CSharpened Aug 16 '12 at 15:05
    
Is just an xml, if xml has any limitation, I am not aware of this, I think it should work. –  Alexandru-Dan Maftei Aug 16 '12 at 15:07
1  
Yes, although obviously you want to exercise some common sense at how complex you let the contracts get. DataContracts are really meant to be simple data structures for messages exchanged to and from the server. On a related note, you should also avoid defining any properties on your data contracts as interfaces. Use only concrete types for your DataContracts. –  Mike C Aug 16 '12 at 15:09
1  
For the example above you should be fine, but depending on how deeply nested your objects are, and how bug they are (when rendered as XML) you might need to tweak the WCF bindings. –  Jaimal Chohan Aug 16 '12 at 15:10
    
Thanks. I will bear all of that in mind. –  CSharpened Aug 16 '12 at 15:25

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