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IQueryable<Organization> query = context.Organizations;

Func<Reservation, bool> predicate = r => !r.IsDeleted;

query.Select(o => new { 
    Reservations = o.Reservations.Where(predicate)
}).ToList();

this query throws Internal ".NET Framework Data Provider error 1025" exception but below query does not.

query.Select(o => new { 
    Reservations = o.Reservations.Where( r => !r.IsDeleted)
}).ToList();

I need to use first one because i need to check few if statement for construct right predicate. I know that i can not use if statements in this circumtence that is why i pass delegate as parameter.

How can i make it work first query ?

share|improve this question
2  
I'm not entirely sure if that's the reason (or even the right direction), but Linq2Objects operates on Expression Trees, which means you usually pass Expression<Func<Reservation, bool>> predicate and not the naked Func<Reservation, bool> predicate. You can always try that. :) – Patryk Ćwiek Aug 16 '12 at 15:28
1  
It sounds like you may want a predicate builder. Take a look at this question. stackoverflow.com/questions/9184942/… – tsells Aug 16 '12 at 16:42
    
@Trustme-I'maDoctor: You're wrong - LINQ to Objects uses delegates. It's LINQ to SQL etc that use expression trees, as they need to translate the query into SQL. LINQ to Objects can just execute the predicates, projects etc directly. – Jon Skeet Aug 21 '12 at 6:02
    
@JonSkeet Absolutely, but good distinction. I sometimes forget that not all collections that you use LINQ on are somehow database-backed :) On a completely unrelated side note, your book is a great read, guess I'll be doing more of a reading than anything else in the next few weeks to come. – Patryk Ćwiek Aug 21 '12 at 8:17
1  
@JonSkeet - I'm getting exactly the same behavior as the OP, except I've abstracted the predicate to a static method, since I'm using it in lots of places. I do not want to copy and paste the predicate into all places where it's being used. What's the solution? – Shaul Behr Dec 13 '12 at 12:59
up vote 12 down vote accepted

While the above answers are true, note that when trying to use it after a select statement one has to call AsQueryable() explicitly, otherwise the compiler will assume that we are trying to use IEnumerable methods, which expect a Func and not Expression<Func>.

This was probably the issue of the original poster, as otherwise the compiler will complain most of the time that it is looking for Expression<Func> and not Func.

Demo: The following will fail:

MyContext.MySet.Where(m => m.SubCollection.Select(s => s.SubItem).Any(expr)).Load()

While the following will work:

MyContext.MySet.Where(m => 
      m.SubCollection.Select(s => s.SubItem).AsQueryable().Any(expr))
         .Load()
share|improve this answer
    
Kudos for completing the answer. Saved my day! – alex440 Apr 27 '14 at 14:38
    
This even works with nested projections (.Include). Excellent job! – Dr. Zim Jan 18 at 5:00

After creating the bounty (rats!), I found this answer, which solved my problem. (My problem involved a .Any() call, which is a little more complicated than this question...)

In short, here's your answer:

IQueryable<Organization> query = context.Organizations;

Expression<Func<Reservation, bool>> expr = r => !r.IsDeleted;

query.Select(o => new { Reservations = o.Reservations.Where(expr) })
  .ToList();

Read the referenced answer for an explanation of why you need the local variable expr, and you can't directly reference another method of return type Expression<Func<Reservation, bool>>.

share|improve this answer
    
seems to me that this is the same as the advice provided by "trust me - I'm a doctor" on the 16'th. Maybe he should get the bounty? – Mike Beeler Dec 13 '12 at 15:08
    
@Mike.Beeler good point, I'll ping him. – Shaul Behr Dec 13 '12 at 15:51
up vote 12 down vote
+100

Thanks for pinging me. I guess I was on the right track after all.

Anyway, to reiterate, LINQ to Entities (thanks to Jon Skeet for correcting me when I got mixed up in my own thought process in the comments) operates on Expression Trees; it allows for a projection to translate the lambda expression to SQL by the QueryProvider.

Regular Func<> works well for LINQ to Objects.

So in this case, when you're using the Entity Framework, any predicate passed to the EF's IQueryable has to be the Expression<Func<>>.

share|improve this answer
    
I have been commented at upside about Func<> delegate and Expression<> parameters. If you look at again on this line of code Reservations = o.Reservations.Where(predicate) you will realize that o.Reservations is ICollection<> not IQueryable<> because it is just navigation property. Any Where extension method on it is IEnumerable<> extension. So it is right to pass Func<> delegate instead of Expression<> . – Freshblood Dec 18 '12 at 16:33

I just experienced this issue in a different scenario.

I have a static class full of Expression predicates which I can then combine or pass to an EF query. One of them was:

    public static Expression<Func<ClientEvent, bool>> ClientHasAttendeeStatus(
        IEnumerable<EventEnums.AttendeeStatus> statuses)
    {
        return ce => ce.Event.AttendeeStatuses
            .Where(a => a.ClientId == ce.Client.Id)
            .Select(a => a.Status.Value)
            .Any(statuses.Contains);
    }

This was throwing the 1025 error due to the Contains method group call. Replacing with a closure fixed the issue:

    public static Expression<Func<ClientEvent, bool>> ClientHasAttendeeStatus(
        IEnumerable<EventEnums.AttendeeStatus> statuses)
    {
        return ce => ce.Event.AttendeeStatuses
            .Where(a => a.ClientId == ce.Client.Id)
            .Select(a => a.Status.Value)
            .Any(x => statuses.Contains(x));
    }

Aside: I then simplified the expression to ce => ce.Event.AttendeeStatuses.Any(a => a.ClientId == ce.Client.Id && statuses.Contains(a.Status.Value));

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