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Without the database part you normally create a new object in Javascript like this:

function object() {
    this.attribOne: 42,
    this.attribTwo: 'fourtytwo',

    [and so on creating more attribs and functions.]
};

Once this is done, you create a new "instance" of the object like this

var myObject = new object;

And myObject will have the correct attributes, functions.

Is there a way to do this if I need to load the attribute values from MongoDB using Mongoose (asynchronously)?

Similar to this?!

function object() {
    /* list of attributes */
    this.attribOne: null,
    this.attribTwo: null,

    function init(){
       // mongoose db call
       // set attributes based on the values from db
    }
};

I looked at the init functions but it seemed that they don't do what I need. (or I just didn't get it)

I assume this is simple and I am overlooking the obvious, so please point me to the right direction. Thanks a lot!

share|improve this question
    
I'm not sure I understand the question. The documents you get from a MongoDB query are already JavaScript objects. –  JohnnyHK Aug 16 '12 at 15:18
    
yes, that is true, but I would like to populate an object which has other attributes and functions which are not stored in the db. For example: this.attribPlus = this.attribOne + this.attribTwo; or similar using a function... I hope this make sense. :) –  42droids Aug 16 '12 at 15:22

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I don't know MongoDB, but you can pretty easily do what you want by passing in the database object you get back from the server into the constructor:

You can pass the object in like so:

var myObject = new object(MongoDBObj);

Then in your object Code you could do something like this:

function object(data) {

this.myProp1 = data.Prop1;//from db obj
this.myProp2 = data.Prop2;//from db obj

this.myProp3 = getProp3Calculation(); //from global calculation

[more functions and props for the object]

}

Edit: for my first comment

You can do this as well (simplistic example);

function object() {

this.myProp1 = null;
this.myProp2 = null;

this.myProp3 = getProp3Calculation(); //from global calculation

this.init = function([params]){
    var that = this;       


    var data = loadData(params);

    //if asynchronous the following code will go into your loadCompletedHandler
    //but be sure to reference "that" instead of "this" as "this" will have changed
    that.myProp1 = data.Prop1;
    that.myProp2 = data.Prop2;

};

[more functions and props for the object]

}

Update 3 - showing results of discussion below:

function object() {

this.myProp1 = null;
this.myProp2 = null;

this.myProp3 = getProp3Calculation(); //from global calculation

this.init = function([params], callback){
    var that = this;       



    var model = [Mongoose Schema];
    model.findOne({name: value}, function (error, document) {
        if (!error && document){

            //if asynchronous the following code will go into your loadCompletedHandler
            //but be sure to reference "that" instead of "this" as "this" will have changed
            that.myProp1 = document.Prop1;
            that.myProp2 = document.Prop2;

            callback(document, 'Success');


        }
        else{
            callback(null, 'Error retrieving document from DB');
    }
    });



};

[more functions and props for the object]

}
share|improve this answer
    
thank you for your reply. i am aware of this option, but this means, I have a DB call "outside" of my object. I would like to keep the DB call inside the object preferably as a function which is executed when I create a new object. eg.: var myObject = new Object().init([parameters]); where the init() function does the DB call and populates the attributes. –  42droids Aug 16 '12 at 15:41
    
Same idea. Instead of passing in the options on create, just fire your object's method and load the object properties from values you get back from your database. You reference the object's properties from the function by using "this".property. I will update my answer above –  muck41 Aug 16 '12 at 15:45
    
Please see code here: pastebin.com/JjtJxrQG (The callback doesn't have to be passed in like that.) Can I access and set the values of "that" inside the DB call? –  42droids Aug 16 '12 at 15:59
    
I cannot get there, network policy, try a jsfiddle –  muck41 Aug 16 '12 at 16:00
    
jsfiddle.net/vah7x :) –  42droids Aug 16 '12 at 16:06

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