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Suppose I have a multiline in Python which raises an Exception.

How does Python decide which line to raise the exception against?

Examples: (Note: I could have used backslashes \ after each line)

(1
 +0/0
 +3)

Thows an exception on line 3 (a ZeroDivisionError exception, at +3)).

(1
 +
 0/0
 )

Throws an exception on line 3.

(0/0
 +
 1)

Throws an exception on line 2.

This question was inspired by this example, and @Godman pointed out that exceptions don't just occur on the last line (as I had previously thought).

share|improve this question
    
You know, I was wondering the same thing when I commented on the other question. –  David Robinson Aug 16 '12 at 16:39
    
In that case it could have been some other, very localized reason (for example, there could be a difference between the .py file and .pyc file). –  David Robinson Aug 16 '12 at 16:40
7  
Usually, it's the last line. In case the source file and the actually running code got out of sync, it might be any line. You can use dis.dis() to see the line numbers assoicated with each bytecode instruction. –  Sven Marnach Aug 16 '12 at 16:40
    
it will not interpret anything(functions included) till it reaches the closing paren... at which point it gets an error so its on line 5 when it gets teh error.. –  Joran Beasley Aug 16 '12 at 16:41
6  
@JoranBeasley: CPython is the standard implementation of the Python language, and quite probably the one you used. :) –  Sven Marnach Aug 16 '12 at 16:55
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2 Answers

Fundamentally, I dont think we all are thinking on the right lines. There is no such thing as the last line here. The exception is raised by the interpreter when it receives an expression fully. According to the Python grammar: http://docs.python.org/reference/grammar.html, the expression is not fully complete until you hit a closing brace ')'. A brief explanation for the same was given by Joran Beasley in the comments against the question itself.

You can do 3 things do judge the correctness of this, without delving much deep into the grammar:-

  1. Write this code in the python interpreter:

    a=(1+2+0/0+4+5)

This also raises ZeroDivionError.

  1. Write this code in the python interpreter:

    a=(1+2+0/0+4+5 # And, press enter

This gives you invalid syntax since the expression is not complete and can not be parsed by the interpreter PS: This is the same as the code mentioned in the question

  1. Write this code in the python interpreter:

a = (1
+2
+0/0
+4
+5)

Eventually, the expression does not complete until you hit the closing brace. Hence, you can continue to add on more sub-expressions inside it without getting any exception. Thus, fundamentally, the interpreter does not see this all as line numbers; it waits until the all the expressions (including the sub-expressions) have completed. And, it is a proper programming control flow for the interpeter.

PS: Forgive my formatting of the answer.

New edit:-

@ Hayden: I thought it would be easy to explain the subtleties by not delving too deep into the grammar. But, for your reference, I am just copying the code from the URL: http://nedbatchelder.com/blog/200804/the_structure_of_pyc_files.html

Steps to run:- 1. Write your code asked in the question in a temp.py file and save it, then, import temp in another file or in the interpreter. This will create temp.pyc 2. Now, copy and paste the full code in the above mentioned URL in byteCodeDetails.py and run the file in command prompt as: python byteCodeDetails.py temp.pyc. The function show_file will be called here and will give the following output:-

magic 03f30d0a
moddate 458c2e50 (Fri Aug 17 23:54:05 2012) code
argcount 0
nlocals 0 stacksize 3 flags 0040 code
640600640200640200151764030017640400175a000064050053 5
0
LOAD_CONST 6 (3)
3 LOAD_CONST 2 (0)
6 LOAD_CONST 2 (0)
9 BINARY_DIVIDE
10 BINARY_ADD
11 LOAD_CONST 3 (4)
14 BINARY_ADD
15 LOAD_CONST 4 (5)
18 BINARY_ADD
19 STORE_NAME 0 (a)
22 LOAD_CONST 5 (None)
25 RETURN_VALUE
consts
1
2
0
4
5
None
3
names ('a',)
varnames ()
freevars ()
cellvars ()
filename 'C:\Users\Python\temp1.py'

name ''
firstlineno 5
lnotab


So, as you can notice that:-

  1. Quoting from the link mentioned above: In the disassembled output, the left-most numbers (1, 2, 3) are the line numbers in the original source file and the next numbers (0, 3, 6, 9, ...) are the byte offsets of the instruction. Similarly, for your code, the left-most number is only 5 which is the line number, and the columns to the right represent the mnemonics (to be read by the interpreter) translated by the compiler for your code., thus indicating how expressions are formed and their formation is overtaken by the value of the line numbers in the compiled code.
  2. firstlineno points to 5.

Now, just make a slight change in your initial code in the temp.py file:-

a = (1
+2
+0/0
+4+
5)

Now, Run through the above 2 steps once again. The following is the output:-

magic 03f30d0a
moddate 0f8e2e50 (Sat Aug 18 00:01:43 2012)
code
argcount 0
nlocals 0
stacksize 3

flags 0040
code 640600640200640200151764030017640400175a000064050053
4
0 LOAD_CONST 6 (3)
3 LOAD_CONST 2 (0)
6 LOAD_CONST 2 (0)
9 BINARY_DIVIDE
10 BINARY_ADD
11 LOAD_CONST 3 (4)
14 BINARY_ADD

5 15 LOAD_CONST 4 (5)
18 BINARY_ADD
19 STORE_NAME 0 (a)
22 LOAD_CONST 5 (None)
25 RETURN_VALUE
consts
1
2
0
4
5
None
3
names ('a',)
varnames ()
freevars ()
cellvars ()
filename 'C:\Users\Python\temp1.py'
name ''
firstlineno 4

lnotab 0f01

Well, now you can clearly see 2 things:-

  1. The byte code is composed of 2 lines shown in the next line to 'code 640600640200640200151764030017640400175a000064050053', prefixed by '4' and '5'. This shows that the compiler has parsed the .py file and converted the code in temp.py into 2 lines of code which will be run by the interpreter. Note that here the contents of line 4 will be executed by the interpreter no matter the expression is complete or not
  2. The value of firstlineno changes to 4 instead of 5

The whole point of this lengthy discussion is that wherever the byte code indicates to the interpreter that this is where a line starts and the corresponding statements which should be executed for this line, then, the interpreter just runs that line and the corresponding statements written next to it.

The code in your question shows firstlineno as 5, that is why you receive an error in line 5. Hopefully, this helps now.

share|improve this answer
    
You're right, in some sense the "line" can remain unbroken by parenthesis. However I don't think this changes anything "fundamentally", but I enjoyed the pun. :) –  Andy Hayden Aug 17 '12 at 12:24
    
@ Hayden: I am not sure you agree with the answer or not –  GodMan Aug 17 '12 at 13:10
    
I disagree, as there is a concept of last line (of an expression) even in the case you are concerned about: If the expression is written using parenthesis the "last line" is simply the one containing the final ). Syntax errors seem to display the final line like other exceptions... –  Andy Hayden Aug 17 '12 at 13:24
    
@ Hayden: I have just put more explanation in the answer, as I was not able to put so much in this comment. The earlier explanation remains intact with just a few formatting changes. Please review. –  GodMan Aug 17 '12 at 19:03
    
Thanks, I've updated the question with some new examples inspired from your answer, I hadn't realised it wasn't just the last line! One thing I couldn't understand/find was how firstlineno is defined, I think that is the bit which would answer this question. –  Andy Hayden Aug 17 '12 at 22:07
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The exception will point to the line* containing either:

  1. The last operator (if the previous literals/operators caused the exception).

  2. The last literal (otherwise i.e. the last literal/operator caused the exception).

.

However, if this is not the behaviour that you see, it may be caused by discrepancies in one of your py (source) files and either its corresponding (compiled) pyc file, or the running code (in memory). The following is an illustrative example.

  • Suppose E.py contains:

    def z():
        0/0
    
  • From the python command line, import E (this will compile E.py into byte-code: E.pyc, and puts into memory).

  • Call E.z(), which will produce an exception, on line 2 in z, displaying the line 0/0 - no surprise here.

  • Go back to the E.py source file, insert two lines at the top, and on the second insert the string "oh dear, oh dear".

  • Go back in the python command line, and call E.z() a second time.

  • The exception (on line 2, in z) now displays "oh dear, oh dear".

*Update: I don't have a reference for this, please comment one if you come across one. I had previously thought that it was the simply the last line!

share|improve this answer
    
It does not matter if the .py and .pyc files are out of sync or not. The important thing is if the .py file is in sync with the actually running code (which is in memory). –  Sven Marnach Aug 17 '12 at 15:01
    
Thanks @SvenMarnach, I didn't realise this was in memory. –  Andy Hayden Aug 17 '12 at 15:10
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