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For clarity, I have 2 columns in my table. I feel like there has to be a way to do this, but I can't think of a way to actually do this without doing a simple query. I'm assuming to use VBA to do an UPDATE statement and put that into a macro, but after doing some research I'm not coming up with anything particularly useful. I've thought about using DISTINCT, but it doesn't seem like I can use that in an UPDATE statement. How should I approach this problem?

EDIT: Sorry it looks like I didn't add enough info, so I'll add it here.

If I start with this:

Column 1 | Column 2
-------------------
    A    |    1
    C    |    3 
    B    |    2
    A    |    1
    C    |    3

I'm trying to end up with this (the order of the rows themselves don't actually matter):

Column 1 | Column 2
-------------------
    A    |    1
    C    |    3
    B    |    2

Someone asked why I'm trying not to do it with queries. The answer is because I'm using a form that's linked to my table (by passing through multiple intermediate queries). On this form I have to be able to type in data and have it added to my table. If I use a query to remove the duplicates, the relationship between the query and table no longer becomes one-to-one, so I'll be unable to type information into the form.

I hope this makes sense, but if it doesn't, just let me know and I'll happily elaborate further.

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2  
More details needed, sample data, what do you mean not using queries, why not. Show us sample data, expected results. –  JonH Aug 16 '12 at 16:43
4  
using queries is how you do things in a database. Any solution that involves doing updates via VBA and macro would just be a needlessly complicated way of running a bunch of queries. –  invertedSpear Aug 16 '12 at 16:49
    
I edited my initial post to answer why I needed to use tables as well as an example. If you need more details, just let me know. –  KryptKeeper Aug 16 '12 at 17:15
1  
If you want to delete duplicates with a query, you will need a unique ID. An autonumber will do very well. –  Fionnuala Aug 16 '12 at 18:19

2 Answers 2

Use distinct to get the rows you want and insert them into a new table. Rename the old table and replace it with the new table.

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Thanks for the response. Unfortunately this wouldn't work for my purposes. I just mentioned this above but this table is attached to a form, so this process has to be done constantly whenever new duplicates are imported into the table. I couldn't add a new table, transfer the data and rename them each time manually. I think that's what you mean, but if I'm misunderstanding your idea, please let me know. –  KryptKeeper Aug 16 '12 at 17:25
3  
No, you understood. I thought it was a one-time thing that you needed to do. Another idea: make those two columns the primary keys, then Access won't allow duplicates to be entered. –  Jim Aug 16 '12 at 17:34

You'll need to use a recordset (for what it's worth you cannot remove duplicates from the table structure you've specified with queries, because there is no unique key to differentiate matching rows by, and to get one you'd have to create a new table):

dim rst as new adodb.recordset
dim c1 as string
dim c2 as string
rst.open "SELECT Column1, Column2 FROM TableName ORDER BY Column1, Column2" _
    , currentproject.connection, adOpenKeyset, adLockOptimistic
restart_:
c1 = rst(0)
c2 = rst(1)
rst.movenext
do while not rst.eof
    if rst.fields(0) = c1 and rst.fields(1) = c2 then  //duplicate
        rst.delete
        rst.requery
        goto restart_
    else
        c1 = rst(0)
        c2 = rst(1)
        rst.movenext
    end if
loop   

The syntax i've used re the deletion operation might be dodgy (Sorry, I always use queries to do deletes)

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