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I am doing my first database project.

I have had the following query in the column of EMAIL_ADDRESS:

...
EMAIL_ADDRESS CHARACTER VARYING(20) NOT NULL, 
...

However, John Saunders uses VARYING(256). This suggests me that I have not necessarily understood the VARYING correctly. I understand it such that the length of an email-address is 20 characters in my case, while 256 for Jodn.

Context in John's code

CREATE TABLE so."User"
     (
         USER_ID SERIAL NOT NULL,
         USER_NAME CHARACTER VARYING(50) NOT NULL,
         EMAIL_ADDRESS CHARACTER VARYING(256) NOT NULL,      /// Here
         HASHED_PASSWORD so.HashedPassword NOT NULL,
         OPEN_ID CHARACTER VARYING(512),                                                         
         A_MODERATOR BOOLEAN,
         LOGGED_IN BOOLEAN,
         HAS_BEEN_SENT_A_MODERATOR_MESSAGE BOOLEAN,
         CONSTRAINT User_PK PRIMARY KEY(USER_ID)
     );

I have never seen email addresses longer than 20 characters, used by ordinary people.

What is the optimal length for an email address in a database?

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What do you mean by "optimal"? What are you trying to "optimize"? –  S.Lott Jul 29 '09 at 10:34
    
are you telling me I'm extraordinary? XD –  fortran Jul 29 '09 at 10:38
    
@S.Lott: I want build a secure system. The increase in user's input increases the risk that they can run codes in the database. --- I see optimal as the best way to have a secure system. –  Masi Jul 29 '09 at 10:40
1  
Well, while there is security considerations in not making something unbounded, adhearing to the standards will always make the most sense. Following what is "common" or "optimal" will likely introduce security issues then reduce them. –  Kitson Jul 29 '09 at 11:39
1  
This question on StackOverflow suggests that the max length is now 254 characters including the "@" sign: stackoverflow.com/questions/386294/… –  dthrasher Feb 11 '10 at 16:35
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7 Answers

up vote 40 down vote accepted

The maximum length of an email address is 320 characters.

Every email address is composed of two parts. The local part comes before the '@' sign, and the domain part follows it. In "user@example.com", the local part is "user", and the domain part is "example.com".

The local part must not exceed 64 characters and the domain part cannot be longer than 255 characters.

In sum, an email address can be 320 characters long at most.

I got that from here

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It seems that it is the best to take 320 as the length. –  Masi Jul 29 '09 at 11:12
28  
I know this is an old thread and there's no problem using 320, but the actual maximum is 254 because of an overriding restriction from RFC2821 that imposes additional constraints over and above those quoted for the local and domain parts. If storage space is an issue, this may be worth people knowing if they stumble on this thread. See Errata ID 1690 in errata to RFC3696 –  flightplanner Apr 25 '12 at 15:48
    
As @flightplanner said, Wikipedia summarizes those sections here: "but the maximum...restricts the entire email address to be no more than 254 characters" –  RustyTheBoyRobot Jun 15 '12 at 18:11
    
I'm down-voting this answer until it is updated. –  Gili Oct 22 '12 at 18:25
    
Especially if you want the email field to have a unique constraint; under INNODB and utf8 varchar(254) is small enough (less than 767bytes) to have a unique constraint and varchar(300) is not. –  Autonomy Apr 11 '13 at 19:14
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from Ask Metafilter:

My data comes from a database of 323 addresses. The distribution has some upper-end outliers (positively-skewed). It is normally distributed without the outliers (I tested it.)

Min: 12 1st quartile: 19 Mean (w/ outliers): 23.04 Mean w/o outliers): 22.79 3rd quartile: 26 Max (w/ outliers): 47 Max (w/o outliers): 35

Median: 23 Mode: 24 Std. Dev (w/ outliers): 5.20 Std. Dev (w/o outliers): 4.70

Ranges based on data including outliers 68.2% of data 17.8 - 28.2 95.4% of data 12.6 - 33.4 99.7% of data 7.4 - 38.6

Ranges based on data outliers excluded 68.2% of data 18.1 - 27.5 95.4% of data 13.4 - 32.2 99.7% of data 8.7 - 36.9

and if you sign up for http://www.abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijk.com/ then your email address would surely be an outlier :)

here's another site with a slightly different mean (N=50,496, mean=23):

alt text

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1  
I don't understand why this is voted down. Yes, its better to allow all valid E-Mail Addresses and go with the suggested RFC compliant length, but this is very interesting. +1 from me. –  Tim Büthe Jul 29 '09 at 10:35
    
@Tim Büthe thanks for the upvote - was wondering why the post got downvoted also :) –  pageman Jul 29 '09 at 10:39
    
+1: for the figure –  Masi Jul 29 '09 at 10:43
    
@Masi actually what's curious is that it's a Poisson distribution rather than a normal distribution - anyone have ideas why it's like that? :P –  pageman Jul 29 '09 at 10:47
    
@pageman: The reason is that each event is randomly distributed AND each event is taken from the infinity space. - You get a similar distribution if you calculate the number of cars driving to RED such that you have time vs. number of cars driving to red in the axes. –  Masi Jul 29 '09 at 11:01
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My work email address is more than 20 characters!

Read the appropriate RFC specification:

"The local-part of an e-mail address may be up to 64 characters long and the domain name may have a maximum of 255 characters"

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7  
Always code to formal specifications. –  DanDan Jul 29 '09 at 10:20
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Perhaps, have a look into the Email Address Length FAQ, which may have some additional information about this topic for you.

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As others have said, way bigger than 20. 256 + 64 sounds good to me, and is RFC compliant.

The only reason to not have such a large value for your database is if you are worrying about performance or space, and if you are doing that then I'm 99.99999999999999% sure that is premature optimization.

Go big.

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VARCHAR only stored the number of characters needed (plus the length). Only issue I see is if you are fighting for space in the 8000 byte per row limit. –  Richard Szalay Jul 29 '09 at 10:57
    
I am not fighting for space. I am fighting for the balance between security and usability. –  Masi Jul 29 '09 at 11:08
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Variable character types in databases don't occupy unneeded space. Thus, there is no reason to constrain such fields as much as possible. Depending on the name of a person, the naming scheme used by their organization and their domain name, an address can easily exceed 20 characters.

There is no limit as to the length of local-part and domain-name in RFC-2822. RFC-2181 limits the domain name to 255 octets/characters though.

Again, since a varchar only uses the space actually used by the string you store, there is no reason to have a small limit for email address length. Just go with 512 and stop worrying. Everything else is premature optimization

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A CHAR(20) field will always take up 20 characters, whether you use it all or not. (Often padded with spaces at the end.) A VARCHAR(20) field will take up up to 20 characters, but may take up less. One benefit of CHAR()s constant width is fast jumping to a row in a table, because you can just calculate the index it must be on. The drawback is wasting space.

The benefit of constant-sized CHAR(x)'s is lost if you have any VARCHAR(x) columns in your table. I seem to recall that MySQL silently converted any CHAR() fields into VARCHAR() behind the scenes if some columns were VARCHAR()s.

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