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I have a column called "Mergecodes" that contains characters(or pairs) separated by commas. Some of the entries contain multiples that need to be removed. Here is an example where 'KD' is a duplicate and therefore one needs to be removed: "T, M, KD, SB, KD". I imagine this would work by counting the number of occurrences and if it contains more than one, delete the extras. I'm just not sure about the syntax for this. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

UPDATE

I was able to get results when using a string('T,M,KD,SB,KD') as @Yaroslav suggested, but when I use the column instead of the string I get no results. Any ideas?

declare @str varchar(100)
select @str = mergecodes from GoldMineTest.dbo.CONTACT1
declare  @separator varchar(1)= ','

;WITH tokens(p, a, b) AS
        (
            SELECT 1, 1, CHARINDEX(@separator, @str)
             UNION ALL
            SELECT p + 1, b + 1, CHARINDEX(@separator, @str, b + 1)
              FROM tokens
             WHERE b > 0
        )
SELECT SUBSTRING(@str, a, CASE WHEN b > 0 THEN b-a ELSE 4000 END) AS Separated_values, count(SUBSTRING(@str, a, CASE WHEN b > 0 THEN b-a ELSE 4000 END))
  FROM tokens
 GROUP BY SUBSTRING(@str, a, CASE WHEN b > 0 THEN b-a ELSE 4000 END)
HAVING count(SUBSTRING(@str, a, CASE WHEN b > 0 THEN b-a ELSE 4000 END))=1
share|improve this question
1  
Which database are you using? –  SOaddict Aug 16 '12 at 16:56
    
Best to write a stored function. There should be many string manipulation functions you can use to split it by comma and then use your preferred method for identifying unique values. –  Miserable Variable Aug 16 '12 at 16:56
    
While you are at it, why don't you normalize the schema? –  RedFilter Aug 16 '12 at 16:59
    
Vutukuri, it's a microsoft sql database for a CRM called Goldmine. The database is called Goldmine and the TABLE is called CONTACT1. –  ajodom10 Aug 16 '12 at 17:01
    
Edited my answer, added a link to a fully functional demo code –  Yaroslav Aug 21 '12 at 9:36

1 Answer 1

EDITED: See this SQL Fiddle demo code.

What I finally did was create a function that takes each row, separates the values deleting duplicates and then concatenate them again to return the new row without duplicated values. Inside the function the code previously posted is used to get separated values deleting the duplicates. The HAVING is not neccesary, only if you want to fully delete the repeated set of characters on that particular row.

Using MS SQL Server. This code should adapt to your needs. It will output a list of non repeated chain of characters separated by whatever your separator is. What you just need is to concatenate the result....not enought time to develop a more detailed answer...

DECLARE @str varchar(4000)='T,M,KD,SB,KD',
        @separator varchar(1)= ','

;WITH tokens(p, a, b) AS
        (
            SELECT 1, 1, CHARINDEX(@separator, @str)
             UNION ALL
            SELECT p + 1, b + 1, CHARINDEX(@separator, @str, b + 1)
              FROM tokens
             WHERE b > 0
        )
SELECT SUBSTRING(@str, a, CASE WHEN b > 0 THEN b-a ELSE 4000 END) AS Separated_values, count(SUBSTRING(@str, a, CASE WHEN b > 0 THEN b-a ELSE 4000 END))
  FROM tokens
 GROUP BY SUBSTRING(@str, a, CASE WHEN b > 0 THEN b-a ELSE 4000 END)
HAVING count(SUBSTRING(@str, a, CASE WHEN b > 0 THEN b-a ELSE 4000 END))=1
share|improve this answer
1  
. . Your code produces three rows of results for "M", "SB", and "T". There is no "KD", but that should appear once. Also, you should bring these back together into a string, using, say "for xml path ('')". –  Gordon Linoff Aug 16 '12 at 17:29
    
Instead of putting the exact string in the @str variable as you did above, how can how can I do this for every row in the column? –  ajodom10 Aug 16 '12 at 18:26
    
@GordonLinoff, as I said, "This code should adapt", that means it needs some development, is to get started...I'm modifying the code right now to fit the answer –  Yaroslav Aug 16 '12 at 19:15
    
Sorry for the late answer, was busy these days...edited my answer –  Yaroslav Aug 21 '12 at 9:29

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