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I have some text in an object's property. I'm testing to see if the object's property has text in it to display; if it doesn't then I display "-" instead of just a blank. It doesn't seem like there's a difference between:

if (MyObject.SomeText && MyObject.SomeText.length) { ... }

if (MyObject.SomeText && MyObject.SomeText.length > 0) { ... }

Are there any edge cases where one syntax would be preferable to the other?

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1  
As long as the values of .length are in the range [0,∞), it should be fine. –  Felix Kling Aug 16 '12 at 17:05
2  
why do you ask a very similar question again? stackoverflow.com/questions/8423754/… –  micnic Aug 16 '12 at 17:08
    
another question by him: stackoverflow.com/questions/8424275/javascript-testing-length with length again Are you obsessed by length? –  micnic Aug 16 '12 at 17:19
    
@micnic: I don't care. –  frenchie Aug 16 '12 at 17:33

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

they give same result. Btw, if its "text", then if (MyObject.SomeText) is enough

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What could do wrong? I'm first testing to see if there's text in the property before calling .length on it. How should I rewrite my test? –  frenchie Aug 17 '12 at 14:07
    
If there's text, then there MUST have .length so do NOT need to check again. To be clear: '' (empty string) is consider false just as null, undefined, 0 and false as well –  Eric Yin Aug 17 '12 at 15:54
    
ah yes, thanks for this idea. –  frenchie Aug 17 '12 at 15:56
    
my pleasure. You must be new to JavaScript for this newbie question. since you have such a huge reputations. In JavaScript, every var is very very flex, basically no type, what value you give it, it becomes the type. So if('') the '' becomes bool and value is false. I don't like JavaScript, too many mistakes after you have a chunk of code :( –  Eric Yin Aug 17 '12 at 16:24
1  
Actually, I'm building a single page webapp that relies a lot on javascript: it's about 13K of javascript so far. But I'm a business guy who's just starting out in tech: 2 years ago I didn't know what classes, json, or SQL were about. So I started reading 5,000 pages of computer books to learn programming and start a company. Take a look at this: answers.onstartups.com/users/15155/frenchie The reason I'm asking about length is that I want to be sure I'm doing it right. If tech people could learn sales, finance and marketing, more startups would be born; the reverse is also true. –  frenchie Aug 17 '12 at 16:54

Are there any edge cases where one syntax would be preferable to the other?

Only edge cases where MyObject.SomeText or MyObject.SomeText.length is not what you expect it to be – for instance:

MyObject = {
    SomeText = {
        length: -42
        // or length: true
    }
};
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No, they are equivalent, if the length equals to 0 then it is valued as false.

(This is possible because JS is not strongly typed, in strongly typed languages length would not be castable as boolean).

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In javascript, a number is only considered "falsey" when it is 0. Any other value is "truthy". Therefore, the statements number != 0 (comparison, not identity) and !number are exactly equivalent.

The only way your two statements would differ is if length was something other than a positive number.

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It's the same:

Boolean(MyObject.SomeText.length)
  • returns true if MyObject.SomeText.length != 0
  • returns false if MyObject.SomeText.length == 0

and

Boolean(MyObject.SomeText.length>0)
  • returns true if MyObject.SomeText.length > 0
  • returns false if MyObject.SomeText.length <= 0

But MyObject.SomeText.length can only be 0 or a positive integrer. So

  • If MyObject.SomeText.length == 0,
    • Boolean(MyObject.SomeText.length) returns false because MyObject.SomeText.length == 0
    • Boolean(MyObject.SomeText.length>0) returns false because MyObject.SomeText.length<=0
  • If MyObject.SomeText.length > 0,
    • Boolean(MyObject.SomeText.length) returns true because MyObject.SomeText.length != 0
    • Boolean(MyObject.SomeText.length>0) returns true because MyObject.SomeText.length > 0
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