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I want to write my own algorithm (just a function really) that takes a range of iterators. If the iterators are from a map, I want to use the data (iterator->second) value. If the iterator is "normal" like a vector or list, I just want to use the dereferenced iterator value.

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1  
I would recommend adapting the iterator instead. I posted two examples of a key iterator in an answer to another question. It would be trivial to transform either of those into a value iterator. –  James McNellis Aug 16 '12 at 19:22
    
I like that, but unfortunately I can't count on having boost on all the systems. –  John Gordon Aug 16 '12 at 19:26
1  
Keep reading: the second implementation presented in that answer does not make use of Boost. –  James McNellis Aug 16 '12 at 19:26
1  
An iterator adapator is the correct solution. Your function should not change behavior just because my value type happened to be a pair. It's the caller's job to make sure the range is correctly defined, not yours. –  GManNickG Aug 16 '12 at 23:07

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I think, value-getter idea is right here, but you can implement it without c++11 and without structs at all, only using functions:

template <typename T> 
const T& get(const T& t)
{
    return t;
}

template <typename T, typename V>
const V& get(const std::pair<T,V>& t)
{
    return t.second;
}


int main()
{
    std::vector<int> v = {1};
    std::cout << get(*v.begin());

    std::cout << "\n----\n";

    std::map<int, std::string> m;
    m.insert(std::make_pair(0, "sss"));
    std::cout << get(*m.cbegin());
}
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1  
I really like this. It's simple, reduces the amount of code that's specialized, and will compile on the old collection of compilers I'm stuck with. –  John Gordon Aug 16 '12 at 19:33

You can make a value-getter class that extracts the value you're interested in. Note that this approach doesn't work if you store pairs in any container (it transforms all pairs, whether in a map or not). I'd think it would be a much clearer approach to only accept "regular" iterators and let it be callers job to transform map iterators appropriately (as suggested in the comments to your question.)

template<typename T>
struct get {
  static auto val(const T& t) -> const T&
  {
    return t;
  }
};

template<typename U, typename V>
struct get<std::pair<U, V>> {
  static auto val(const std::pair<U, V>& p) -> const V&
  {
    return p.second;
  }
};

// use like
get<decltype(*iter)>::val(*iter);

Convenience function could look like:

template<class T>
auto getval(const T& t) -> decltype(get<T>::val(t))
{
  return get<T>::val(t);
}
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I'll give this an upvote if you add the convenience function. I started to do it on the fly, but it's not trivial. <g> –  Pete Becker Aug 16 '12 at 19:08
    
D'oh. Of course. –  Pete Becker Aug 16 '12 at 19:17
1  
There's no reason for the auto return values for val(...) is there? –  Dave Aug 16 '12 at 19:20
    
@Dave, not necessarily, no. –  eq- Aug 16 '12 at 19:22

You can overload the function based on the input:

void foo(const std::vector<int>::iterator& it1, const std::vector<int>::iterator& it2) 
{
   //use *it
}
void foo(const std::map<int,int>::iterator& it1, const std::map<int,int>::iterator& it2)
{
   //use it->second
}

Edit:

I think this is the closest you can get to what you want to achieve:

template <typename T, typename X>
void foo(T const& x, X const& y)
{

}

template <typename T, typename S>
void foo(const typename std::map<T,S>::iterator& x, const typename std::map<T,S>::iterator& y)
{

}

int main()
{
    std::map<int,int> x;
    std::vector<int> y;
    foo(x.begin(), x.end()); //will call second version
    foo(y.begin(), y.end()); //will call first version
}
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perhaps I was too specific in the title, but I was hoping to avoid specific container names, so I wouldn't have to write a separate function for every container type. Maybe I'm looking for a way to overload based on the value_type being a pair or not. –  John Gordon Aug 16 '12 at 18:57
    
@JohnGordon see edited answer, perhaps it's closer to what you need. –  Luchian Grigore Aug 16 '12 at 19:01

A trait should do the trick. First the type-deducing helper:

template <typename Iter>
typename iter_value<Iter>::value_type & iter_deref(Iter it)
{
    return iter_value<Iter>::deref(it);
}

All we need is something like this:

template <typename Iter>
class iter_value
{
    template <typename T> struct aux
    {
        typedef T type;
        static type & deref(Iter it) { return *it; }
    };
    template <typename U, typename V> struct aux<std::pair<U const, V>>
    {
        typedef V type;
        static type & deref(Iter it) { return it->second; }
    };

    typedef typename std::iterator_traits<Iter>::value_type type;

public:
    typedef typename aux<type>::type value_type;

    static value_type & deref(Iter it)
    {
        return aux<type>::deref(it);
    }
};
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You can create a function that extracts the value out of the iterator. Then you can overload that based on the type of the iterator. You can use that function in your algorithm. Assuming a vector of ints and a map of string->int, it could look like this:

int getValue(const std::vector<int>::iterator& it)
{
    return *it;
}

int getValue(const std::map<std::string, int>::iterator& it)
{
    return it->second;
}

Then the algorithm can use the function getValue() to get a value from the iterator.

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