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For Metro apps there's Windows.Devices.Input.KeyboardCapabilities.KeyboardPresent. Is there a way for Windows 8 desktop programs to detect whether a physical keyboard is present?

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@JamesMcNellis, that question is about connecting/disconnecting a keyboard while this one is about whether there's a keyboard available in the first place. Not quite an exact duplicate, even if the answer is totally relevant. – Mark Ransom Aug 16 '12 at 19:55
    
Use WMI, Win32_Keyboard class. – Hans Passant Aug 16 '12 at 20:51
    
@James: That's certainly interesting, thanks. However, I found that GetRawInputDeviceList() reports a keyboard on a tablet computer which clearly doesn't have a (physical) one. – Giel Aug 16 '12 at 20:52
    
I would expect KeyboardPresent also to return true then. Does it? – James McNellis Aug 16 '12 at 21:21

It's a bit fiddly and I don't know whether the approach I'm proposing will work in all cases, but this is the approach I ended up using:

  1. Use SetupDiGetClassDevs to find all the keyboard devices.
  2. Use SetupDiGetDeviceRegistryProperty to read some keyboard device properties to ignore PS/2 keyboards
  3. Check for touch support since Win 8 touch devices always appear to have an additional HID Keyboard device.

One of the problems with PS/2 ports is that they show up as always being a keyboard device, even if nothing is plugged in. I just managed the problem by assuming no one will ever use a PS/2 keyboard and I filtered them out. I've include two separate checks to try and figure if a keyboard is PS/2 or not. I don't know how reliable either one is, but both individually seem to work okay for the machines I've tested.

The other problem (#3) is that when Windows 8 machines have touch support they have an extra HID keyboard device which you need to ignore.

PS: Something I just realised, my code is using a "buffer" class for the property queries. I left it out to keep just the relevant code, but you'll need to replace that with some appropriate buffer/memory management.

#include <algorithm>
#include <cfgmgr32.h>
#include <Setupapi.h>
#include <boost/tokenizer.hpp>
#include <boost/algorithm/string.hpp>

struct KeyboardState
{
    KeyboardState() : isPS2Keyboard(false)
    {   }

    std::wstring deviceName; // The name of the keyboard device.
    bool isPS2Keyboard;      // Whether the keyboard is a PS/2 keyboard.
};

void GetKeyboardState(std::vector<KeyboardState>& result)
{
    LPCWSTR PS2ServiceName = L"i8042prt";
    LPCWSTR PS2CompatibleId = L"*PNP0303";
    const GUID KEYBOARD_CLASS_GUID = { 0x4D36E96B, 0xE325,  0x11CE,  { 0xBF, 0xC1, 0x08, 0x00, 0x2B, 0xE1, 0x03, 0x18 } };

    // Query for all the keyboard devices.
    HDEVINFO hDevInfo = SetupDiGetClassDevs(&KEYBOARD_CLASS_GUID, NULL, NULL, DIGCF_PRESENT);
    if (hDevInfo == INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE)
    {
        return;
    }

    //
    // Enumerate all the keyboards and figure out if any are PS/2 keyboards.
    //
    bool hasKeyboard = false;
    for (int i = 0;; ++i)
    {
        SP_DEVINFO_DATA deviceInfoData = { 0 };
        deviceInfoData.cbSize = sizeof (deviceInfoData);
        if (!SetupDiEnumDeviceInfo(hDevInfo, i, &deviceInfoData))
        {
            break;
        }

        KeyboardState currentKeyboard;

        // Get the device ID
        WCHAR szDeviceID[MAX_DEVICE_ID_LEN];
        CONFIGRET status = CM_Get_Device_ID(deviceInfoData.DevInst, szDeviceID, MAX_DEVICE_ID_LEN, 0);
        if (status == CR_SUCCESS)
        {
            currentKeyboard.deviceName = szDeviceID;
        }

        //
        // 1) First check the service name. If we find this device has the PS/2 service name then it is a PS/2
        //    keyboard.
        //
        DWORD size = 0;
        if (!SetupDiGetDeviceRegistryProperty(hDevInfo, &deviceInfoData, SPDRP_SERVICE, NULL, NULL, NULL, &size))
        {
            try
            {
                buffer buf(size);
                if (SetupDiGetDeviceRegistryProperty(hDevInfo, &deviceInfoData, SPDRP_SERVICE, NULL, buf.get(), buf.size(), &size))
                {
                    LPCWSTR serviceName = (LPCWSTR)buf.get();
                    if (boost::iequals(serviceName, PS2ServiceName))
                    {
                        currentKeyboard.isPS2Keyboard = true;
                    }
                }
            }
            catch (std::bad_alloc)
            {
            }
        }

        //
        // 2) Fallback check for a PS/2 keyboard, if CompatibleIDs contains *PNP0303 then the keyboard is a PS/2 keyboard.
        //
        size = 0;
        if (!currentKeyboard.isPS2Keyboard && !SetupDiGetDeviceRegistryProperty(hDevInfo, &deviceInfoData, SPDRP_COMPATIBLEIDS, NULL, NULL, NULL, &size))
        {
            try
            {
                buffer buf(size);
                if (SetupDiGetDeviceRegistryProperty(hDevInfo, &deviceInfoData, SPDRP_COMPATIBLEIDS, NULL, buf.get(), buf.size(), &size))
                {
                    std::wstring value = (LPCWSTR)buf.get();

                    // Split the REG_MULTI_SZ values into separate strings.
                    boost::char_separator<wchar_t> sep(L"\0");
                    typedef boost::tokenizer< boost::char_separator<wchar_t>, std::wstring::const_iterator, std::wstring > WStringTokenzier;
                    WStringTokenzier tokens(value, sep);

                    // Look for the "*PNP0303" ID that indicates a PS2 keyboard device.
                    for (WStringTokenzier::iterator itr = tokens.begin(); itr != tokens.end(); ++itr)
                    {
                        if (boost::iequals(itr->c_str(), PS2CompatibleId))
                        {
                            currentKeyboard.isPS2Keyboard = true;
                            break;
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
            catch (std::bad_alloc)
            {
            }
        }

        result.push_back(currentKeyboard);
    }
}

bool IsNonPS2Keyboard(const KeyboardState& keyboard)
{
    return !keyboard.isPS2Keyboard;
}

bool HasKeyboard()
{
    std::vector<KeyboardState> keyboards;
    GetKeyboardState(keyboards);

    int countOfNonPs2Keyboards = std::count_if(keyboards.begin(), keyboards.end(), IsNonPS2Keyboard);

    // Win 8 with touch support appear to always have an extra HID keyboard device which we
    // want to ignore.
    if ((NID_INTEGRATED_TOUCH & GetSystemMetrics(SM_DIGITIZER)) == NID_INTEGRATED_TOUCH)
    {
        return countOfNonPs2Keyboards > 1;
    }
    else
    {
        return countOfNonPs2Keyboards > 0;
    }
}
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Simple : Look into HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\ControlSet001\Services\kbdclass

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