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Is there a way I can select a bunch of prespecified elements all at once from a matrix? Specifically, suppose I have the following matrix:

      58        59        60       62        63        64
58  0.000000  3.772139  6.367721 8.978718 12.197210 13.401126
59  3.772139  0.000000  3.755554 5.935946  9.592700 11.664533
60  6.367721  3.755554  0.000000 5.999409  9.324764 11.991269
62  8.978718  5.935946  5.999409 0.000000  3.810169  6.762802
63 12.197210  9.592700  9.324764 3.810169  0.000000  3.796884
64 13.401126 11.664533 11.991269 6.762802  3.796884  0.000000

I want to select cells [1,2], [2,3], [3,4], [4,5] ,[5,6]. I realize that I can reference them by index, in this case I can run:

mymatrix[c(2,9,16,23,30)].

However, this is not very clear from reading the code later. Is there a way I can enter the actual (row,column) reference all at once?

Thanks!

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Something like as.vector(mymatrix[c(1, 2, 3, 4, 5), c(2, 3, 5, 6)]) (mymatrix[row, column]) –  dickoa Aug 16 '12 at 19:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Indexing can be done with 2 column matrices. After converting those row and column numbers to a valid R object (rather than Matlab-style expressions):

> idxs <- gsub("\\]",")", gsub("\\[", "c(",  "[1,2], [2,3], [3,4], [4,5] ,[5,6]") )
# I edited the string value that idxs returned:
> midx <- rbind( c(1,2), c(2,3), c(3,4), c(4,5) ,c(5,6) )
> mat <-  matrix(scan(), nrow=6)  
1:  0.000000  3.772139  6.367721 8.978718 12.197210 13.401126
7:   3.772139  0.000000  3.755554 5.935946  9.592700 11.664533
13:   6.367721  3.755554  0.000000 5.999409  9.324764 11.991269
19:   8.978718  5.935946  5.999409 0.000000  3.810169  6.762802
25:  12.197210  9.592700  9.324764 3.810169  0.000000  3.796884
31:  13.401126 11.664533 11.991269 6.762802  3.796884  0.000000
37: 
Read 36 items
> mat[midx]
[1] 3.772139 3.755554 5.999409 3.810169 3.796884

If your goal were to index the super-diagonal that could be accomplished more generally:

> mat[col(mat)==row(mat)+1]
[1] 3.772139 3.755554 5.999409 3.810169 3.796884
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1  
+1 very nice! midx <- matrix(c(1:5,2:6),,2) would be a slightly easier way to construct midx. –  Joshua Ulrich Aug 16 '12 at 19:17
    
I was thinking he wanted the solution to an arbitrary set of x-y pairs. Speculation: Your diag() approach with a reduced matrix is probably faster than my row==col+1 approach. –  BondedDust Aug 16 '12 at 19:21
    
I was interested in the general case for my own edification. However, for the problem I'm looking at, the diag method works great. Thank you both! –  user1357015 Aug 16 '12 at 19:25

A solution to your specific situation would be to select the sub-matrix and use the diag function:

R> diag(x[-ncol(x),-1])
[1] 3.772139 3.755554 5.999409 3.810169 3.796884
share|improve this answer
    
I find that more "readable" than indexes, but I'm sure I'm in the minority. –  joran Aug 16 '12 at 19:15
    
Yeah, @joran, I didn't get it at first but now after being encouraged to look again, I see what happening. Probably fairly efficient –  BondedDust Aug 16 '12 at 19:23

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