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I am working on a VB.Net project in which I need to load Nvidia's API NvApi.lib. However on the Nvidia website it says:

"NvAPI cannot be dynamically linked to applications. You must create a static link to the library and then call NvAPI_Initialize(), which loads nvapi.dll dynamically."

My understanding is that .Net does not support static linking is there a way to wrap the NvApi.lib file so that I can call it from Visual Basic? P.S. I have seen a project here called NvApi.net which leads me to believe that it is possible but that project seems incomplete and was abandoned in 2009 and the features I need were added to the API in 2010.

EDIT:

I was able to get it working. I added a new visual c++ CLR class project to my solution. After linking the nvapi.lib file as a dependence and adding the nvapi.h file to the project I was able to write a small wrapper for the methods I needed. Below is the code I used. It just allows me to turn on and off the 3D stereo.

#include "nvapi.h"

public ref class NvApiWrapper
{   
public: 
static bool NvApiWrapper_Initialize(){
    if (NvAPI_Initialize() == 0){
        return true;
    } else {
        return false;
    }
}

static bool NvApiWrapper_Stereo_Enable(){
    if (NvAPI_Stereo_Enable() == 0){
        return true;
    } else {
        return false;
    }
}

static bool NvApiWrapper_Stereo_Disable(){
    if (NvAPI_Stereo_Disable() == 0){
        return true;
    } else {
        return false;
    }
}
};
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You would need to create a c++/cli wrapper which is statically linked to the .lib and then exposes .net classes etc. This is exactly where c++/cli comes in the most handy.

This tutorial has a good walkthrough (based on the older managed c++ syntax but the concepts are the same)

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You can create a C++/CLI dll, which links statically to the lib, and wraps it. If you've then exposed some appropriate CLI interfaces from your dll, you should then be able to call those from VB.net.

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