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I'm trying to get IP and Port of client, connected to the server socket. I pass the following function client socket file descriptor, but it returns 0.0.0.0:0 This drives me crazy, but sometimes it returns something like 248.127.0.0:24870... What am I doing wrong?

PS returned address length is 16. Result returned by function is 0. No errors occur.

void    SocketServer::Log ( int socketFD , string message )
{
    struct sockaddr                     address;
    socklen_t                           addressLength;
    struct sockaddr_in*                 addressInternet;
    string                              ip;
    int                                 port;

    int result = getpeername ( socketFD , &address , &addressLength );
    cout << "Address length is " << addressLength << "     Return is " <<  result << "\n";
    addressInternet = (struct sockaddr_in*)&address;

    ip = inet_ntoa ( addressInternet->sin_addr );
    port = ntohs ( addressInternet->sin_port );

    cout << "Socket FD is " << socketFD << " " << ip << ":" << port << " " <<  message << "\n";
};
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You forgot to set addressLength before calling getpeername. You need:

addressLength = sizeof(address);

As the documentation says:

The returned address is truncated if the buffer provided is too small

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thanks in advance! Worked fine for me. I just can't get one idea. Why is this function designed this way? Why should I calculate the size of address, why can't the function calculate it? –  Kolyunya Aug 16 '12 at 20:50
    
And why is this parameter (I mean address length) needed? I just can't get it... –  Kolyunya Aug 16 '12 at 20:51
    
The function does calculate the size of the address. But it needs to know that your buffer is big enough to hold the whole address. Remember, getpeername is protocol-neutral. New protocols, that require larger buffers, may be added after your code is written. Copying an address into a buffer that isn't large enough to hold it could be catastrophic. –  David Schwartz Aug 16 '12 at 21:00
    
But I pass the function a pointer to my buffer. So, why can't the function look itself if it's big enough or not and make some actions depending on this calculation? –  Kolyunya Aug 16 '12 at 21:07
    
There's no way to look at a buffer and tell how big it is. How would you know what was the end of the buffer? –  David Schwartz Aug 16 '12 at 21:17

You need to pass a full sockaddr_in instance to getpeername() instead of a sockaddr instance, and you need to set the addressLength before calling getpeername():

void SocketServer::Log ( int socketFD , string message )       
{       
    struct sockaddr_in                  address = {0};       
    socklen_t                           addressLength = sizeof(address);       
    string                              ip;       
    int                                 port;       

    int result = getpeername ( socketFD , (struct sockaddr*) &address , &addressLength );       
    cout << "Address length is " << addressLength << "     Return is " <<  result << endl;       

    ip = inet_ntoa ( address.sin_addr );       
    port = ntohs ( address.sin_port );       

    cout << "Socket FD is " << socketFD << " " << ip << ":" << port << " " <<  message << endl;       
}; 
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