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I am writing something as follows

module Test
   def self.print(*args)
      p 'something'
      p args
   end
end

def print(*args)
  p "print something"
  p args
end

def method_caller(method_name, *args)
  send(method_name, *args)
end

method_caller(:print, 2) # this works fine
method_caller("print", 2, 3) # this one also
method_caller("Test.print", 2) # this doesn't work

Basically, I pass method_caller the name of a method and some arguments and then I use the send method to actually invoke the method.

I usually pass in the name of the method as a symbol, but how would I deal with Test.print? I imagine at some point I might be passing in objects and having them call their own methods.

The method I would like to invoke could be literally anywhere.

UPDATE:

Trying out each suggestion, the explicit receiver looks like a good way to do it since it's obvious what is happening, but what about christianblais' idea. I changed it to avoid the eval call as such

def method_caller(method_name, *args)
  if method_name.is_a?(String)
    chain = method_name.split('.')
    obj, method_name = Object.const_get(chain[0...-1].join('.')), chain[-1]
    obj.send(method_name, *args)
  else
    send(method_name, args)
  end
end

Which means I can just say method_caller("Test.print", 2), but maybe there are some gotchas...

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You can't call an instance method with that sort of chaining, because the const_get won't work if the first part is not a class (Foo.bar works, but foo.bar won't). –  Michael Kohl Aug 16 '12 at 21:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Well, why don't you give your method_caller a receiver argument?

def method_caller(receiver, method_name, *args)
  receiver.send(method_name, *args)
end

method_caller(Test, :print, 2)

The other calls need to use self as the receiver, which is implicit in your current implementation. But finally all this gives you is an incomplete ad hoc reimplementation of send, so one really wonders what you are trying to achieve with that.

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Well, it is something like a ruby DSL interpreter-like kind of thing, and I would like to be able to have that interpreter invoke other ruby methods and do things with the return value. I figured using send would work out. –  MxyL Aug 16 '12 at 20:33
    
Well, then the explicit receiver is probably a good idea anyway. –  Michael Kohl Aug 16 '12 at 20:39

There's two things here.

1) Your example won't work, as you're trying to call Test.print with an argument while your method definition doesn't accept one. EDIT: Just saw your update. It's now ok. Sorry!

2) It's evil, but you could always use eval like this :

module Test
   def self.print(*args)
     p 'something'
     p args
   end
end

def method_caller(method_name, *args)
  if method_name.is_a?(String)
    chain = method_name.split('.')
    eval(chain[0...-1].join('.')).send(chain.last, args)
  else
    send(method_name, args)
  end
end

method_caller(:print, 2) # this works fine
method_caller("print", 2, 3) # this one also
method_caller("Test.print", 2) # this doesn't work
share|improve this answer
    
The chain idea is interesting. I've adapted it to avoid the eval call, but not sure how reliable it is. –  MxyL Aug 16 '12 at 20:47

Is the passing of the method to call as a string a requirement or is it just an idea you had ? A more ruby-ish solution would be to simply pass a block ...

method_caller(2) { |*args| Object.print(*args) }

Or to give the method object as argument

method_caller(Object.method(:print), 2)

Which, by the way, works for any object that responds to #call (labmdas, ...)

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