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[DataContract]
public class UniqueNamedItem
{
    [DataMember]
    int Id { public get; protected set; }
    [DataMember]
    string Name { public get; protected set; }
}

[KnownType(typeof(UniqueNamedItem))]
[DataContract]
public class BasicNode : UniqueNamedItem
{
    [DataMember]
    SortedList<string, BasicNode> Children { public get; private set; }

    public void addChild(BasicNode bn)
    {
        this.Children.Add(bn.Name, bn);
    }
}

Can you tell me why inside my addChild function the call to bn.Name is not valid even though the UniqueNamedItem.Name property has a public get accessor?

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4  
What makes you think those properties are public? –  Ed S. Aug 16 '12 at 20:36

6 Answers 6

up vote 12 down vote accepted

The default accessibility for members of classes is private.

So Id and Name are private.

You need to add the correct access modifiers (I added public, you may have meant protected):

[DataContract]
public class UniqueNamedItem
{
    [DataMember]
    public int Id { public get; protected set; }
    [DataMember]
    public string Name { public get; protected set; }
}

One good reason to always declare the accessibility you want.

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1  
Oded 1 question I have. Can we access Parent class varible by Child Class object as the Danny R is doing. bn.Name bn is basicNode object and Name is not the member of BasicNode class. Can you explain it. –  Waqar Janjua Aug 16 '12 at 20:41
1  
@WaqarJanjua - If it is inherited, it is directly accessible by the child class. Since BasicNode inherits from UniqueNamedItem, it has a Name member and with the right access modifiers, it can access it. –  Oded Aug 16 '12 at 20:44
    
Thanks for explanation. –  Waqar Janjua Aug 16 '12 at 20:45

The UniqueNamedItem.Name property itself is private; you need to explicitly mark the property as public.

The modifiers on accessors can only restrict access further, not increase it.

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For this use, protected would be enough (assuming the OP wants that kind of encapsulation). –  Oded Aug 16 '12 at 20:45

You need to declare your properties as public (see below). The default is private.

[DataContract]
public class UniqueNamedItem
{
    [DataMember]
    public int Id { public get; protected set; }
    [DataMember]
    public string Name { public get; protected set; }
}
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You need to make your properties public:

[DataContract]
public class UniqueNamedItem
{
    [DataMember]
    public int Id { public get; protected set; }
    [DataMember]
    public string Name { public get; protected set; }
}
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Your properties are not explicitly marked as public, thus C# automatically considers them to be private.

So:

[DataContract]
public class UniqueNamedItem
{
    [DataMember]
    int Id { public get; protected set; }
    [DataMember]
    public string Name { public get; protected set; }
}
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The default access is private, because if you make something public when it should really be private, it won't stop any correct code from working, and it could be that way for years before you realise (and it's also a breaking change to then fix it).

If on the other hand you make something private when it should be public, something will stop working immediately, you go on stackoverflow, a bunch of people say it's private, you fix it, and all is well.

Hence it's a sensible default.

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