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From the documentation I've realized that I can use Caliburn Micro's coroutines for async operations. Out of the box and without extra technologies. So I've implemented the next code in my Windows Phone app:

public class SimpleViewModel : Screen
{
    // ...

    protected override void OnViewLoaded(object view)
    {
        base.OnViewLoaded(view);

        Coroutine.BeginExecute(RunTask());
    }

    public IEnumerator<IResult> RunTask()
    {
        yield return new SimpleTask();
    }

    // ...
}

SimpleTask:

public class SimpleTask : IResult 
{
    public void Execute(ActionExecutionContext context)
    {
        Thread.Sleep(10000);
    }

    public event EventHandler<ResultCompletionEventArgs> Completed;
}

I've hoped that code in Execute method will run async. But this not happen. My UI-thread was blocked for 10 seconds.

Where I made a mistake? Or my assumption about async nature of coroutines was wrong?

share|improve this question
    
Is this preferable in some way to the async and await keywords in C# 5.0? – Robert Harvey Aug 16 '12 at 21:16
    
@RobertHarvey I think there is no difference what to use. Documentation and discussion forum says that coroutines provides the same functionality as async and await. But I want to know have I correctly understand documentation or not? – Alex Aug 16 '12 at 21:23
up vote 11 down vote accepted

I spent the whole day searching for and trying code samples to finally have something that works (i.e. async operations using Caliburn Coroutines that do not block the UI), so I allow myself to share it.

As far as I understand, Coroutines in Caliburn do not handle threads, they just provide an elegant way to have async execution and control code handled in one method. One has to use other tools such as BackgroundWorkers to process operations in background threads.

I found this link pretty interesting, for silverlight. The aim was to include the background worker in a class that wraps coroutine calls.

As I wanted it in WPF with slight differences, I ended up with this code sample that works on my machine:

Wrapping class:

using System;
using Caliburn.Micro;
using System.ComponentModel;

namespace MyApp.Implementation
{
    public class BackgroundCoRoutine : IResult
    {
        private readonly System.Action action;

        public BackgroundCoRoutine(System.Action action)
        {
            this.action = action;
        }

        public void Execute(ActionExecutionContext context)
        {
            using (var backgroundWorker = new BackgroundWorker())
            {
                backgroundWorker.DoWork += (e, sender) => action();
                backgroundWorker.RunWorkerCompleted += (e, sender) => Completed(this, new ResultCompletionEventArgs());
                backgroundWorker.RunWorkerAsync();
            }
        }

        public event EventHandler<ResultCompletionEventArgs> Completed = delegate { };

    }
}

And in one of my ViewModels, the following:

    public IEnumerable<IResult> ProcessTask()
    {
        IsBusy = true;
        TempObject result = null;

        for (int i = 1; i < 4; i++) // Simulates a loop that processes multiple items, files, fields...
        {
            yield return new BackgroundCoRoutine(() =>
            {
                System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(1000); // Time consuming task in another thread
                result = new TempObject("Item " + i);
            });

            MyObservableCollection.Add(result); // Update the UI with the result, in the GUI thread
        }

        IsBusy = false;
    }

With this, when I click on the ProcessTask button, the UI is not frozen, and the computed results appear as soon as they are made available by the background worker process. The IsBusy state is not mandatory but shows how UI-related states can go into the async-oriented code.

Hope this will help another me!

share|improve this answer

Your issue is that the Coroutine.BeginExecute runs the codes immediately. You have to either run the code an a separate Task or Thread, or call asynchronous code within your coroutine. There is nothing automatic about Coroutine code that will stop your UI from blocking.

share|improve this answer
    
Does that mean that, if he can get off the UI thread, the coroutines will work fine? Or do you actually have to create a thread for each coroutine? – Robert Harvey Aug 16 '12 at 21:21
    
Thanks for answer. But will it works async if I'll place a coroutine in an action which is binded to a button for example? – Alex Aug 16 '12 at 21:42
    
@RobertHarvey I've posted my own answer with the link to discussions forum on the Codeplex. Check it. It's very useful. – Alex Aug 17 '12 at 12:08

Caliburn.Micro Coroutines help you to execute async routines in a synchronous way. Not the other way around. Regarding your problem: Out of the box CM gives you the possibilities to find a solution quite fast... ;-)

To accomplish what you'd like to do, I'd recommend you to take a look at the .NET BackgroundWorker and create a coroutine (IResult) around it.

http://caliburnmicro.codeplex.com/discussions/391929

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