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If you have a switch statement and want certain code to be run when the value is one value or another how do you do it? The following code always goes to the default case.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int x = 5;
    switch(x)
    {
        case 5 || 2:
            cout << "here I am" << endl;
            break;
        default:
            cout << "no go" << endl;
    }

    return 0;
}
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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Like this:

switch (x)
{
case 5:
case 2:
    cout << "here I am" << endl;
    break;
}

Known as "falling through".

Just to point out that the reason the default case is executed in the posted code is that the result of 5 || 2 is 1 (true). If you set x to 1 in the posted code the 5 || 2 case would be executed (see http://ideone.com/zOI8Z).

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Why does 5 || 2 evaluate to 2? That's not logical or... –  Celeritas Aug 16 '12 at 21:54
    
@Celeritas, I never said it evaluates to 2 and it is logical OR. –  hmjd Aug 16 '12 at 21:55
    
Sorry I meant 5 || 2 evaluates to 1. But in binary 101 OR 11 = 111 which is 7, not 1. Right? –  Celeritas Aug 16 '12 at 22:04
    
@Celeritas, it is logical OR, not bitwise. Check out the link in my answer. –  hmjd Aug 16 '12 at 22:07

Make it fall through:

int main()
{
    int x = 5;
    switch(x)
    {
        case 5:
        // there's no break statement here,
        // so we fall through to 2
        case 2:
            cout << "here I am" << endl;
            break;
        default:
            cout << "no go" << endl;
    }

    return 0;
}

5 || 2, by the way, evaluates to 1 (or true, as it is a logical expression), you can try it.

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Let the switch fall-through:

switch(x)
{
    case 2:
    case 5:
        cout << "here I am" << endl;
        break;
    default:
        cout << "no go" << endl;
}
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case2:
case5:
   //do things
   break;
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Here is a really good read about switch/case and their slight difference between C/C++ and some other information about labels (ABCD:) you might like to know.

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