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I'm generating bitmasks for some calculations I'm doing, where I need to mask an int such that all except the x rightmost bits become zero. I do this using:

int mask = ~(-1 << x);

This works fine for all values of x except for x = 32. It should return -1 then, but it returns 0. What is happening here?

Also, I tried this:

int mask = -1 >>> 32 - x;

At x = 0 it should return 0, yet it returns -1. Somehow shifting something by 32 causes the operation to return the left side of the operator. When I try shifting -1 by 33 or 34 bits it returns a value as if it shifted by 1 or 2. Am I correct in assuming Java actually does something like this:

int mask = ~(-1 << x % 32);

and

int mask = -1 >>> (32 - x) % 32;

?

If so, why would you want this loop around behavior if you go above the 32 bit length of the int? The documentation on Oracle clearly states:

The unsigned right shift operator ">>>" shifts a zero into the leftmost position

But clearly that's not actually what it's doing when it has to shift by more than 32...

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1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Yes, you're correct; shifts are modded by 32 (or 64, for longs) before they're applied.

JLS 15.19:

If the promoted type of the left-hand operand is int, only the five lowest-order bits of the right-hand operand are used as the shift distance. It is as if the right-hand operand were subjected to a bitwise logical AND operator & (§15.22.1) with the mask value 0x1f (0b11111). The shift distance actually used is therefore always in the range 0 to 31, inclusive.

If the promoted type of the left-hand operand is long, then only the six lowest-order bits of the right-hand operand are used as the shift distance. It is as if the right-hand operand were subjected to a bitwise logical AND operator & (§15.22.1) with the mask value 0x3f (0b111111). The shift distance actually used is therefore always in the range 0 to 63, inclusive.

As to why Java chose this behavior, I don't have any advice for you.

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Ok, thanks for the quick answer, but why? What's the reason for this extra bit of work to mod by the size of the datatype? Why not just return 0 for shifts equal to or higher than the size of the datatype? Is there maybe a use case for this that is often used and justifies this behavior? –  FinalArt2005 Aug 16 '12 at 21:38
    
Hm, maybe now that you showed that it just masks the right hand side of the operator it might be faster to do this than to check if the shift is above 32 and if so return 0 (the behavior I want), cause any other shift, especially the max value of an int, might take far too long to calculate... –  FinalArt2005 Aug 16 '12 at 21:45
1  
If I had to guess? I'd say that hardware shifts have varying behavior in that special case, and this implementation would be branch-free on almost all processors, whereas the alternative would require branching on an operation most people expect to be blazing fast. I also suspect that shifts by a fixed distance are more common than the alternative. –  Louis Wasserman Aug 16 '12 at 21:46

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