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Following up on my question from the other day, I've run into another thing that now I've spent too many hours banging my head against.

Mostly, I'm having trouble getting the SUCCESS form to submit. I tried this as well:

jQuery form submit

Here's the code in a semi-functional fiddle:

http://jsfiddle.net/ZcgqV/

Essentially what happens is this:

  1. I bind a method to the form's submission via onSubmit (rather than click)
  2. On submit, it calls a remote server via jQuery .ajax() call
  3. If the response is "PENDING", retry every 1s, nine times
  4. On failure, don't submit the form
  5. On success, submit the form

No matter what I try, I can't get the form to either submit when I want it to without going into a loop, or not submit immediately while it tries the remote server.

~Frustrated-trying-100-things-that-fail-ly yours...

Here's the code directly in case you dislike fiddles:

var retries = 0;
var success = false;
var token = "toki wartooth is not a bumblebee";

$(document).ready(function() {
    // Attach the action to the form
    $('#tehForm').attr('onSubmit', 'onsubmit_action(event)');
});

function async(fn) {
    setTimeout(fn, 1000);
}

function pollServer() {
    $.ajax({
        type: "POST",
        cache: "false",
        url: "/remoteCall",
        dataType: "json",
        data: {
            ref_token: token
        }
    }).done(function(data, code, jqXHR) {

        switch (data.status) {
        case "SUCCESS":
            alert("Success");
            success = true;

            // --> HERE IS WHERE I WANT THE FORM TO SUBMIT <--

            break;

        case "PENDING":
            if (retries < 9) {
                retries += 1;
                async(function() {
                    pollServer();
                });
            } else {
                alert("Failed after 9 tries");
            }
            break;

        case "ERROR":
            alert("Error");
            break;

        default:
            alert("Some kind of horrible error occurred");
            break;
        }

    }).fail(function(jqXHR, textStatus) {
        var statusCode = jqXHR.status;
        alert("Request failed: " + statusCode + " " + textStatus);
    });

}

function onsubmit_action(event) {
        pollServer();
        if (success === false) {
            // RETURN FALSE DIDN'T WORK, SO I FOUND THIS
            event.preventDefault();
        }
}​

EDIT:

Again, the real problem here is that I stop submission of the form. On SUCCESS, I want the form to submit. Currently if I use .submit() in SUCCESS, the AJAX is called again, starting the process over. What I want is the ACTION of the FORM to fire on SUCCESS only.

share|improve this question
    
NOTE: I know this is a seemingly common question, but I have yet to come across an answer that is working for me, which is why I'm asking. Believe, me I've been reading/trying. –  Spanky Aug 16 '12 at 23:19
    
I don't really understand what your code is trying to do, from what I can gather try set ajax context: $('#tehForm'); then you can use $(this) // == context so $(this).submit() –  Philip Aug 16 '12 at 23:24
2  
Is there a need to poll the server every 1s? If not, but you want fast polling, I'd recommend calling a function to do another ajax call in the done handler when you match the PENDING case. The reason I ask is every 1s is REALLY frequently, and you're bound to get crazy behavior from it. Binding it to the done handler will guarantee you fire calls as fast as the browser can process one (and having the max 4 ajax calls the browser can handle running simultaneously doesn't seem useful in most cases). –  brandwaffle Aug 16 '12 at 23:25
    
Since almost all of the actual functionality has been stripped out to make it into an easy example, it doesn't really "do" much. RE: the polling, I should only need to poll once, maybe twice. –  Spanky Aug 16 '12 at 23:30
    
your call to preventDefault() should be the first line in your onsubmit_action function. This is what stops the form submitting. –  Paul Aug 16 '12 at 23:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Trying to use as much of the original code as possible; here is a solution:

Post form with post back http://jsfiddle.net/tpm7v/4/

Post form via Ajax http://jsfiddle.net/tpm7v/5/

    var retries = 0,
    token = "toki wartooth is not a bumblebee",
    sendRequest,
    handelResponse,
    postFormToServer,
    $theForm = $('#tehForm');

$(document).ready(function() {
    // Attach the action to the form
    $theForm.bind('submit', onsubmit_action);
});

sendRequest = function() {
    $.ajax({
        type: "POST",
        cache: "false",
        url: "/remoteCall",
        dataType: "json",
        data: {
            ref_token: token
        },
        success: handelResponse
    });
};

postFormToServer = function() {
    $.ajax({
        type: "POST",
        cache: "false",
        url: "/remoteCallToTakFormData",
        dataType: "json",
        data: $form.serialize(),
        success: function() {
            alert('success!');
        }
    });
};

handelResponse = function(data, code, jqXHR) {
    switch (data.status) {
        case "SUCCESS":
            postFormToServer();
            break;

        case "PENDING":
            if (retries < 9) {
                retries += 1;
                setTimeout(sendRequest , 1000);
            } else {
                alert("Failed after 9 tries");
            }
            break;

        case "ERROR":
            alert("Error");
            break;

        default:
            alert("Some kind of horrible error occurred");
            break;
        }
};

function onsubmit_action(evt) {
    evt.preventDefault();
    sendRequest();
}
​
​

Keep in mind I am going off the code your provided. You should be able to port this to work with your actual implementation. You may also want to try something like https://github.com/webadvanced/takeCommand to help clean up all the Ajax calls.

share|improve this answer
    
This should work, but I would recommend also setting a var that determines whether you've set the retry timer so you only call setTimeout once. You can also do var timer_id = setTimeout() so that you can then later unset the timeout with clearTimeout() after you've tried to hit the endpoint 9 times unsuccessfully. –  brandwaffle Aug 16 '12 at 23:51
    
This looks promising, I will get back to you after I've tried it. Thank you. –  Spanky Aug 16 '12 at 23:51
    
@Spanky Let me know how it goes. May need to tweak a few things to get it to work. Would be happy to answer any questions. –  Paul Aug 16 '12 at 23:53
    
@Spanky you should be able to just call sendRequest rather than using the setTimeout. It should just fire another ajax call as soon as the previous one returns PENDING. It will in turn call handelResponse, which will check the response string and either rerun sendRequest, or submit the form with the now-unbound handler. –  brandwaffle Aug 17 '12 at 0:03
    
@brandwaffle I have to give the backend call time to complete without bombarding it. It will return PENDING within 1-2ms every time, so I need to give it time to get a result, thus the timeout. –  Spanky Aug 17 '12 at 0:06

Please see my comment above for more information, but I think the problem you're seeing here is this:

Every time pollServer() fires, it's not only doing another ajax call, but it's prepping to do 9 possible ajax calls every second based on the retries loop. Since you're then setting another pollServer() call with the async() method, you're basically compounding your ajax calls out of control. You want to get the ajax call out of your retry loop, then you should at least be only getting 1 request a second, not 1, then 2, then 3, etc. I may have read the code wrong, but this is my best guess on what you're seeing.

UPDATE: I'm not sure my explanation was clear, so I thought I'd add some additional info. Basically, every time pollServer() is called and gets a PENDING response, it calls async, which registers a setTimeout(). setTimeout() keeps running every second, doing pollServer(), which then calls asynch, which registers another setTimeout() which also runs every second. Now you have two functions, which each then call setTimeout(), assuming they're still getting PENDING as a response from the server. So after 2 rounds of failed calls, you have 4 setTimeout() calls each firing an ajax call (and a new setTimeout) every second.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. I am not seeing this type of out of control/compounding behavior. The calls go 1s, 2s, 3s like they should, but when success is reached, I can't get the form to post. If I call form.submit() in case:SUCCESS, it just starts all over again. –  Spanky Aug 16 '12 at 23:33
    
If I don't do it in the async call, the setTimeout doesn't work at all and all 9 fire as fast as possible. This was the only way it respected the timeout. See: fitzgeraldnick.com/weblog/35 –  Spanky Aug 16 '12 at 23:44

First off it should be: $('#tehForm').submit(onsubmit_action); or $('#tehForm').on("submit",onsubmit_action); or something like that. Never use the string form to pass a function. It uses the evil eval statement.

Next, after POST the data is already submitted. That is the whole reason for post. Why do you need all sorts of error handling in the done section. Fail should handle error handling.

If you are asking about how to try again after a timeout, try this: Is it possible to check timeout on jQuery.post()?

I believe timeout will fall into fail.

So try this:

var retries = 0,
    max_tries = 9,
    success = false,
    token = "toki wartooth is not a bumblebee";

$(document).ready(function() {
    // Attach the action to the form
    $('#tehForm').on("submit",submit_the_form);
});

function submit_the_form(e){
   var dfd = $.ajax({
       url : "sendTokenPolling", 
       data : {"token":token},
       timeout : 5000 //you may want 1000, but I really think that is too short
    });
   dfd.done(function(){
      //success, form posted
   });
   dfd.fail(function(){
      //did not work/timedout
      if (retries < max_tries){
         retries += 1;
         submit_the_form(e);
      }
   });
}
share|improve this answer
    
Parris, I believe the OP is in a situation where the server might respond, but a particular backend process might still be running that will require that the client wait. In this case, the fail method will never run, and the client will not try and resubmit the form. I don't believe the response will ever be a timeout (at least not in the 'standard' case the OP is accounting for). –  brandwaffle Aug 16 '12 at 23:44
    
The AJAX POST is to a remote server, not the local page. I am basing the activity of the current form off of the response from a remote call. –  Spanky Aug 16 '12 at 23:45
    
Also, yes, thank you, I am aware of the evil eval thing, it's again an example. But thanks, not enough people recognize this. –  Spanky Aug 16 '12 at 23:46
    
I hate to belabor the point, but I don't think this example ever hits the fail handler. The PENDING response would be handled in the success handler. –  brandwaffle Aug 16 '12 at 23:52
    
I believe the way a timeout works is that you specify how long you are willing to wait for the response. See here: api.jquery.com/jQuery.ajax ... Timeout starts at the moment $.ajax is called. Timeout is done in ajax I believe the request is canceled. I revised my answer a bit. –  Parris Aug 16 '12 at 23:53

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