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Given the markup

<div id="header">
<a href="cattle.html" class="current">Cattle Farms</a>
</div>

And style

#header
{
width: 960px;
height: 200px;
margin-bottom: 20px;
}

#header a
{
width: 100%;
height: 100%;
display: block;
font-size: 25px;
}

How whould I go about placing/positioning/aligning the text "cattle farms" so that it sits 20px from the left and 20px from the bottom in such a manner that it does not break the a out of the div visually even when looking it with Firebug.

share|improve this question
    
Is this the question: how to stretch that text to full screen width? –  Stano Aug 17 '12 at 0:25
    
@Stano: No the question is very clear. How to place the text within a in a div. –  Jawad Aug 17 '12 at 0:38
2  
@Jawad: If people are asking questions about your question, your question is not clear. –  Blender Aug 17 '12 at 0:45
    
@Blender: Ok. My own answer should make it clear than. –  Jawad Aug 17 '12 at 0:54
    
Puffffffff. People use downvotes just because they are given a right to do so. –  Jawad Aug 17 '12 at 0:56
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could simply add a <span> to the anchor and add some padding to that. Like this:

<div id="header">
  <a href="cattle.html" class="current"><span>Cattle Farms</span></a>
</div>

And add these additional styles:

#header a span {
padding-left: 20px;
padding-bottom: 20px;
}

EDIT:

Also, add overflow: hidden to the header.

#header {
overflow: hidden;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Man a is set to display: block and height/width: 100% which means a has the same height/width as div which is 960px X 200px –  Jawad Aug 17 '12 at 0:29
    
@Jawad So remove the width/height of the anchor... –  Connor Aug 17 '12 at 0:35
    
@Jawad I've added a fiddle. I think it's what you're after. –  Connor Aug 17 '12 at 0:39
    
Can't take away 100% width and height on a since, and it should be obvious from the markup, that the whole area is now clickable. –  Jawad Aug 17 '12 at 0:39
    
OK than. Make the red area also clickable. ??? –  Jawad Aug 17 '12 at 0:41
show 9 more comments

You need to specify position: relative on the parent container:

CSS:

#header {
  position: relative;

  width: 960px;
  height: 200px;
}

#header a {
  position: absolute;

  bottom: 20px;
  left: 20px;
}
share|improve this answer
    
That much I knew but as I said it breaks the a out of the div. –  Jawad Aug 17 '12 at 0:28
    
I can do the same with a{position: relative; top: 180px; left: 20px;} –  Jawad Aug 17 '12 at 0:41
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I would recommend taking away the 100% width and height. By doing this, you'll be able to place it within the header. If you don't, you're expanded to the size of the header, so there's no room to change your placement.

Since it's a block element, you can do this a few ways. You can either use margin to "push" it away from other elements (if you decide to add more on top of it). Or you can you use "position: relative" and "top" or "left". I would recommend using this with a %. I tried this code and it achieved the effect you were looking for I think:

#header{
width: 960px;
height: 200px;
}

#header a {
display: block;
position: relative;
top: 95%;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Can't take away 100% width and height on a since, and it should be obvious from the markup, that the whole area is now clickable. –  Jawad Aug 17 '12 at 0:37
    
Ahhh... I gotcha. That makes sense. In that case you'll want to take Connor's approach and add a span within the anchor tag and position that within the clickable area. –  Paul Calabro Aug 17 '12 at 0:57
    
Can't take Connor's approach as I am fraid of the terminator. (joke). Any way I figured it out see my answer. –  Jawad Aug 17 '12 at 1:00
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Well. I have no idea why this works. But it does

div#header a
{
width: 100%;
height: 100%;
display: block;
text-indent: 20px;
line-height: 350px;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm actually puzzled why this works as well. Any ideas anyone? The child's line-height is bigger than the parent's height, yet the parent doesn't grow, nor is their overflow. –  Paul Calabro Aug 17 '12 at 1:13
    
@PaulCalabro: I am not sure neither I have good enough knowledge in font theroy but the line-height (leading?) may get "cut-off" at the 200px limit. –  Jawad Aug 17 '12 at 1:24
    
The weird thing is it doesn't. If you were to use 450px for the line-height, it breaks out of the box. Very strange! –  Paul Calabro Aug 17 '12 at 2:39
    
@PaulCalabro: stackoverflow.com/questions/12044983/… –  Jawad Aug 20 '12 at 20:55
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