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I obviously don't know what I'm doing when it comes to parallel programming with .NET 4.0. I have a simple Windows app that starts a task to do some mindless work (outputting numbers 1-1000). I put a substantial pause in half way through to simulate a long running process. While this long pause is taking place, if I hit the Stop button, its event handler calls the Cancel method of CancellationTokenSource. I don't want to do any further processing (in this case, outputting a message) in the Stop button's event handler until the canceled task is done with its current iteration. How do I do this? I tried using Task.WaitAll, etc in the Stop button's event handler, but that just throws an unhandled AggregateException. Here's the code which will help explain my problem if run as described above:

  private Task t;
  private CancellationTokenSource cts;

  public Form1()
  {
     InitializeComponent();
  }

  private void startButton_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
  {
     statusTextBox.Text = "Output started.";

     // Create the cancellation token source.
     cts = new CancellationTokenSource();

     // Create the cancellation token.
     CancellationToken ct = cts.Token;

     // Create & start worker task.
     t = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => DoWork(ct), ct);
  }

  private void DoWork(CancellationToken ct)
  {
     for (int i = 1; i <= 1000; i++)
     {
        ct.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();

        Thread.Sleep(10);  // Slow down for text box outout.
        outputTextBox.Invoke((Action)(() => outputTextBox.Text = i + Environment.NewLine));

        if (i == 500)
        {
           Thread.Sleep(5000);
        }
     }
  }

  private void stopButton_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
  {
     cts.Cancel();

     Task.WaitAll(t);  // this doesn't work :-(

     statusTextBox.Text = "Output ended.";
  }

  private void exitButton_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
  {
     this.Close();
  }

Any help with this would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You would normally just use Task.Wait (instead of WaitAll), as it's a single task. and then handled the exception appropriately:

private void stopButton_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    cts.Cancel();
    try
    {
        t.Wait();  // This will throw
    }
    catch (AggregateException ae)
    {
       ae.Handle<OperationCanceledException>(ce => true);
    }

    statusTextBox.Text = "Output ended.";
}

When you cancel a Task, the OperationCanceledException will get wrapped into an AggregateException and be thrown as soon as you call Wait() or try to get the Task's Result (if it's a Task<T>).


Purely for your information - This is one place, especially given what you're doing here, where C# 5 simplifies things. Using the new async support, you can write this as:

// No need for "t" variable anymore 
// private Task t;


private async void startButton_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
   statusTextBox.Text = "Output started.";

   // Create the cancellation token source.
   cts = new CancellationTokenSource();

   try
   {
      // Create & start worker task.
      await Task.Run(() => DoWork(cts.Token));
      statusTextBox.Text = "Output ended.";
   }
   catch(OperationCanceledException ce) 
   {
      // Note that we get "normal" exception handling
      statusTextBox.Text = "Operation canceled.";
   }
}

private void stopButton_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
   // Just cancel the source - nothing else required here
   cts.Cancel();
}
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I wanted to ask you some reference on Task, Task<T> , async and await, i have seen your blog posts and wanted to read more about. would you recommend any reference? –  DarthVader Aug 17 '12 at 0:44
1  
@DarthVader My blog is good for tasks - for async/await, msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/vstudio/hh378091.aspx and Jon Skeet's blog –  Reed Copsey Aug 17 '12 at 0:53
    
Thank you so much for answering my question, Reed, and for the additional information going forward with C# 5. You explained everything very thoroughly. Thanks again! –  Mac Aug 17 '12 at 1:33

Sorry, not enough reputation to just add a question as a comment to that answer. I wanted to ask how a work-around is considered an answer.

Doesn't the code in the answer rely on some sort of user interface tweak to keep the user from starting more than one background process at a time? That's always a problem, of course.

Here, I present an alternative that answer the question that is stated. It shows how to wait for the cancellation request to finish. It does this in a way that still lets the UI screw things up if it is not managed well, but has code that actually waits after the cancellation, if that is what is really needed. This is an excerpt from a larger C# class:

AutoResetEvent m_TaskFinishedEvent = new AutoResetEvent( false );
private IAsyncAction m_Operation = null;

private Task WaitOnEventAsync( EventWaitHandle WaitForEvent )
{
    return Task.Run( () => { WaitForEvent.WaitOne(); } );
}

public async void Start()
{
if( m_Operation != null )
    {
        // Cancel existing task
        m_Operation.Cancel();
        // Wait for it to finish. This returns control to the UI.
        await WaitOnEventAsync( m_TaskFinishedEvent );
    }
    // Start the background task.
    m_Operation = ThreadPool.RunAsync( WorkerMethod );
}

private void WorkerMethod( IAsyncAction operation )
{
    while( m_Operation.Status != AsyncStatus.Canceled )
        ; // Add real work here.

    m_TaskFinishedEvent.Set();
}

This code relies on an event object to signal that the task is mostly finished. The WorkerMethod() code has not returned yet, but all useful work is done when the event is signaled.

I did not provide a Stop() function because of how I use this code. The code to do the wait would just go in that Stop() function if that was how the code needs to work.

Yes, you cannot use a regular Wait() function because of the cancellation exception. But the accepted answer is more of a work-around, no offense (and maybe I'm wrong?).

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