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My question. I think I have a performance killing subquery but can't prove it. My first tries using JOIN failed. Can somebody provide a more high performing solution or confirm that this is indeed acceptable as it is?

I have two tables, one that contains a todo-list (joblist) and one that tracks every user's progress (userprogress). A job can but must not be to watch a video. (It's a site for e-learning.)

When videos have been watched they are automatically set to 'finished' on an enum field. Users may also skip videos manually (status = 'skipped').

Table structures are provided below.

To get the first video that a user have not watched at all (no record in userprogress) or has begun to watch (status = 'begun') I am using this query.

I have set indexes on ever field that is being used for selection or ordering. However I am unsure if they are all needed.

The SELECT statement has two parts

  1. An inner subselect, where I fetch all seen or skipped videos
  2. The main statement, where I fetch the first video not among the ones found by (1)

There is a named parameter for PHP (:email), to avoid SQL-injection.

SELECT jl.where_to_do_it FROM joblist AS jl
INNER JOIN userprogress AS up
ON (jl.joblistID = up.joblistID)
WHERE jl.what_to_do = 'video'
     AND jl.joblistID NOT IN
      (
        SELECT injl.joblistID
        FROM joblist AS injl
        INNER JOIN userprogress AS inup
        ON (injl.joblistID = inup.joblistID)
        WHERE
             (inup.status = 'finished' OR inup.status = 'skipped')
          AND
             inup.email = :email
          AND
             injl.what_to_do = 'video'
      )
ORDER BY jl.joborder ASC
LIMIT 0,1

This is the output from EXPLAIN, which I need some help understanding.

id select_type  table     type  possible_keys                 key         key_len  ref          rows   Extra
1  PRIMARY      jl        ref   PRIMARY,what_to_do            what_to_do  602      const        9      Using where; Using filesort
1  PRIMARY      up        ref   joblistID                     joblistID   3        jl.joblistID 1      Using index
2  DEP-SUB      injl  eq_ref    PRIMARY,what_to_do            PRIMARY     3        func         1      Using where
2  DEP-SUB      inup  eq_ref    nodup,email,joblistID,status  nodup       455      const,func   1      Using where

The create table commands:

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `joblist` (
  `joblistID` mediumint(10) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `what_to_do` varchar(200) COLLATE utf8_swedish_ci NOT NULL,
  `where_to_do_it` varchar(100) COLLATE utf8_swedish_ci NOT NULL,
  `joborder` mediumint(6) NOT NULL,
  `track` enum('fast','slow','bonus') COLLATE utf8_swedish_ci NOT NULL DEFAULT 'slow',
  `chapter` tinyint(11) unsigned NOT NULL COMMENT 'What book chapter it relates to',
  PRIMARY KEY (`joblistID`),
  KEY `nodupjobs` (`joborder`,`chapter`),
  KEY `what_to_do` (`what_to_do`),
  KEY `where_to_do_it` (`where_to_do_it`),
  KEY `joborder` (`joborder`),
  KEY `track` (`track`),
  KEY `chapter` (`chapter`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB  DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 COLLATE=utf8_swedish_ci COMMENT='Suggested working order';


CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `userprogress` (
  `upID` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `email` varchar(150) COLLATE utf8_swedish_ci NOT NULL COMMENT 'user id',
  `joblistID` mediumint(9) unsigned NOT NULL COMMENT 'foreign key',
  `progressdata` varchar(300) COLLATE utf8_swedish_ci DEFAULT NULL COMMENT 'JSON object describing progress',
  `percentage_complete` tinyint(3) unsigned DEFAULT NULL,
  `status` enum('begun','skipped','finished') COLLATE utf8_swedish_ci DEFAULT 'begun',
  `lastupdate` datetime NOT NULL,
  `approved` datetime DEFAULT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`upID`),
  UNIQUE KEY `nodup` (`email`,`joblistID`),
  KEY `email` (`email`),
  KEY `joblistID` (`joblistID`),
  KEY `status` (`status`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB  DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 COLLATE=utf8_swedish_ci COMMENT='Keep track of what the user has done';
share|improve this question
    
I've got two working (and one not working) answers. I've so far only upvoted both. If there is a discernible advantage to one over the other, I need help in deciding which one to accept as the accepted answer. (Or perhaps someone will come along with an even better solution.) I'll wait a day or two before I set an answer as accepted. – itpastorn Aug 17 '12 at 11:28

Yes, you are correct. IN and NOT IN are particularly bad performers in mysql. Here is a revised version:

SELECT jl.where_to_do_it
FROM joblist jl INNER JOIN
     userprogress up
     ON (jl.joblistID = up.joblistID)
 WHERE jl.what_to_do = 'video' and
       not exists (
           (SELECT 1
            FROM joblist injl INNER JOIN
                 userprogress inup
                 ON (injl.joblistID = inup.joblistID)
            WHERE (inup.status = 'finished' OR inup.status = 'skipped') and
                  inup.email = :email and
                  injl.what_to_do = 'video' and
                  ini1.joblistid = j1.joblistid
          )
ORDER BY jl.joborder ASC
LIMIT 0,1
share|improve this answer
    
I'll give this a try tomorrow (time to sleep). Thanks for the answer. I'll reward you if it works. (I think it will!) – itpastorn Aug 17 '12 at 1:14
    
Quick question before I turn the computer off. Do I need both the ON statement and the last equals comparison in the subselect? They seem to my untrained eye to do the same thing. – itpastorn Aug 17 '12 at 1:17
    
Yes. The last equal is replacing the "not in" condition. The rest is your original query. – Gordon Linoff Aug 17 '12 at 1:23
    
Yes, I see now. (It was 3 am when I wrote that last comment.) My initial tests confirm that your query works, but it lacks one parenthesis, to close the not exists clause, and it spells "injl" as "ini1" in the lat equals clause. My abbreviations were: j-l = job list, i-n-j-l = inner job list, u-p, user progress, inup = inner user progress. – itpastorn Aug 17 '12 at 11:07

Looks like you're running in circles... Your subquery is looking for Videos with status finished or skipped and then in the outter query lookin for the ones that don't have that status, I would change that for a condition like this

SELECT jl.where_to_do_it FROM joblist AS jl
INNER JOIN userprogress AS up
ON (jl.joblistID = up.joblistID)
WHERE jl.what_to_do = 'video'
 AND up.status <> 'finished' AND inup.status <> 'skipped'
 AND up.email = :email
 AND jl.what_to_do = 'video'

Or maybe I understand wrong, anyway the problem seems to be the NOT IN (i will not suggest to use this ever) instead try changing the subquery in the condition and do a Left join with it and add a condition And SQ.joblistID IS NULL, something like this

 SELECT jl.where_to_do_it FROM joblist AS jl
 INNER JOIN userprogress AS up
 ON (jl.joblistID = up.joblistID)
 LEFT JOIN (
    SELECT injl.joblistID
    FROM joblist AS injl
    INNER JOIN userprogress AS inup
    ON (injl.joblistID = inup.joblistID)
    WHERE
         (inup.status = 'finished' OR inup.status = 'skipped')
      AND
         inup.email = :email
      AND
         injl.what_to_do = 'video'
  ) SQ ON jl.joblistID = SQ.joblistID
 WHERE jl.what_to_do = 'video'
 AND SQ.joblistID IS NULL      
 ORDER BY jl.joborder ASC

But i think the first option will work...

Hope it helps

share|improve this answer
    
The first suggestion fails, because userprogress may not have a matching record at all. It should work both when there is a status = 'begun' and when there is no record at all for that user. Looking at 2nd suggestion.... – itpastorn Aug 17 '12 at 11:10
    
The second suggestion seem to work, judged by my initial tests. For that, I'll give you an upvote. – itpastorn Aug 17 '12 at 11:20
    
thanks for the upvote. I think the first solution might work if you change the INNER JOIN for a LEFT JOIN and change the conditions (that involve the userprogress table) in the WHERE part to the ONconditions in the join. If not, well second solution will work faster than the NOT IN or the NOT EXISTS, i use this method all the time. – saul672 Aug 17 '12 at 13:15

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