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All over our project, we have this kind of enums. They works just fine, but we are not sure about them.

Specially with the getDocumentType(String) method.

Is there a way to avoid the iteration over all the Enums field ?

public enum DocumentType {

    UNKNOWN("Unknown"),
    ANY("Any"),
    ASSET(Asset.class.getSimpleName()),
    MEDIA(Media.class.getSimpleName()),
    MEDIA35MM(Media.class.getSimpleName() + " 35mm");


    private String label;

    private DocumentType(String label) {
    	this.label = label;
    }

    public String getLabel() {
    	return label;
    }

    public static DocumentType getDocumentType(String label){
    	for(DocumentType documentType : DocumentType.values()){
    		if(documentType.getLabel().equals(label)){
    			return documentType;
    		}
    	}
    	return UNKNOWN;
    }
}

Edit : Check the newacct response. She's fine too.

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1  
It's tempting to store a static Map of labels to enum instances, but frustratingly, java won't let you reference a static field from an enum's constructor. –  skaffman Jul 29 '09 at 12:31
1  
I wonder why do you use Asset.class.getSimpleName() instead of just writing "Asset" ? Do you plan to change the name by refactoring? –  kd304 Jul 29 '09 at 12:43
1  
Because it's always good practice to use class literals instead of strings? –  skaffman Jul 29 '09 at 12:45
    
@skaffman: Okay, then why aren't there an Unknown and Any class? –  kd304 Jul 29 '09 at 12:46
    
Because you don't invent a class just so you can refer to its name, but if the class already exists, then use the literal. –  skaffman Jul 29 '09 at 14:55
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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You're going to have to do that iteration somewhere, due to the restrictions in writing enums. In an ideal world, you would populate a static Map from within DocumentType's constructor, but that's not allowed.

The best I can suggest is performing the iteration once in a static initializer, and storing the enums in a lookup table:

public enum DocumentType {

    .... existing enum stuff here

    private static final Map<String, DocumentType> typesByLabel = new HashMap<String, DocumentType>();
    static {
        for(DocumentType documentType : DocumentType.values()){
            typesByLabel.put(documentType.label, documentType);
        }
    }

    public static DocumentType getDocumentType(String label){
        if (typesByLabel.containsKey(label)) {
        	return typesByLabel.get(label);
        } else {
        	return UNKNOWN;
        }
    }
}

At least you won't be doing the iteration every time, although I doubt you'll see any meaningful performance improvement.

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+1 Just what I was thinking of, you beat me to it though =) –  mikek Jul 29 '09 at 12:40
1  
I just spent 10 minutes or so shouting at the compiler –  skaffman Jul 29 '09 at 12:40
    
If there are are 100's of elements in the enum (or even <ugh> thousands) then this might be a performance improvement ... might, especially if you are looking these up a lot. –  aperkins Jul 29 '09 at 13:29
    
Why not just use an EnumMap? –  Chris Kessel Jul 29 '09 at 20:20
1  
And store it where? EnumMap is just an optimized Map, it's not magic. –  skaffman Jul 29 '09 at 20:26
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As far as I know (For what it's worth), that is the best way to do what you want.

That is how I would do it at least.

If your enum count grows significantly (couple hundred - thousands) you may want to add a Maping of Strings to enums to do the look-up a little faster. But for the small amount of eunums you have, this may be overkill.

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If the strings are known at compile-time, and if they are valid identifiers, you can just use them as the names of the enums directly:

public enum DocumentType { Unknown, Any, Asset, Media, Media35mm }

and then get it by .valueOf(). For example:

String label = "Asset";
DocumentType doctype;
try {
    doctype = DocumentType.valueOf(label);
} catch (IllegalArgumentException e) {
    doctype = DocumentType.Unknown;
}
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A colleague was comming with the same solution. It's fine for most of the time, not in our precise case, but for next iteration will will check if we really nead a identifier and a label. –  Antoine Claval Jul 30 '09 at 8:05
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Looks fine to me.

I'd leave the iteration as it is. Sure you could add a Map<'label','DocumentType'> implementation to the enum class and do a lookup but it won't increase performance significantly.

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