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Currently working on a 2-way lookup association generic, sorted by TKey. At some point I hope to have access like the following:

public class Assoc<TKey, TValue>
{
     public TKey this[TValue value] { get; }
     public TValue this[TKey value] { get; }
}

But obviously when TKey == TValue this will fail. Out of curiosity, is there a conditional compile syntax to do this:

public class Assoc<TKey, TValue>
{
     [Condition(!(TKey is TValue))]
     public TKey this[TValue value] { get; }

     [Condition(!(TKey is TValue))]
     public TValue this[TKey value] { get; }

     public TKey Key(TValue value) { get; }

     public TValue Value(TKey value) { get; }
}
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When would using the class with TKey == TValue be useful? –  casablanca Aug 17 '12 at 1:40
    
What does public TKey this[TValue value] { get; } do? I'm not understanding the purpose of this API. –  Matthew Aug 17 '12 at 1:54
    
@casablanca, Have you ever used Dictionary<string, string>? It looks like Jake wants to have something very similar to a dictionary, but with associative search by both key and value. –  Alexei Levenkov Aug 17 '12 at 2:07
    
I faced a similar problem once. I just used something like if value.GetType() == typeof(TKey) in the getter and depending was taking action. But I think you already guessed the alternative... –  Guillaume Aug 17 '12 at 2:15
    
@Matthew the key is for sorting, not lookup; slightly different than what you would immediately assume at first impression i suppose. –  Jake Aug 17 '12 at 17:00
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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

No, there is no conditional compiltation based on Generic types.

Generics substitutions are performed at runtime, not compile time.

This is one of the differences between .NET generics and C++ templates.

Generics also don't have the concept of specialization that C++ templates have.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/c6cyy67b.aspx

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2  
+1. Note "Generics are resolved at runtime, not compile time." is not exactly true - at compile time methods in generic class need to be properly found (which is exact error Jake's class produces when compiler tries to pick which version of indexer needs to be used). –  Alexei Levenkov Aug 17 '12 at 2:16
2  
Agree with @Alexei; the issue here has nothing to do with runtime behavior of generics. This is purely a matter of method overload resolution, which is a compile-time construct. In particular, the problem is that with no qualifiers (such as where TKey: Foo, etc.) these are both treated by the compiler as object and thus the normal method overload collission behavior -- when two methods share the same parameter types (i.e. object) -- kicks in. This is a compile time scenario. –  Kirk Woll Aug 17 '12 at 3:12
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