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I am attempting to optimize my code after seeing some repetition.

Here is the code:

function show($div, $change, $value){
    var $container = "#" + $div;
    var $class = $div + "-" + "hidden";

    //alert($class + $container + $change + $value);

    $($container).addClass($class);
    $($container).animate({
        $change: $value
    }, 1000, function(){
            $($container).removeClass($class);
        } 
    );
}

show('header', 'top', '0');
show('nav', 'left', '0');
show('wrapper', 'opacity', '0');

This area: $change: $value - is where I am having trouble in the script. Can I do this? Should they come in as strings?

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted
function show($div, $change, $value){
    var $container = "#" + $div;
    var $class = $div + "-" + "hidden";

    //alert($class + $container + $change + $value);

    $($container).addClass($class);

    var animation = {}; // create another object
    animation[$change] = $value; // and set its property

    $($container).animate(animation, 1000, function(){
            $($container).removeClass($class);
        } 
    );
}
share|improve this answer
    
Geez I just noticed how confusing the $ to start the variable is. Just came from PHP land so a little stuck there... I'll try that. Can you explain the animation object and how this sets the property. I'm not quite getting it. – EZDC Aug 17 '12 at 2:00
    
@user980988: it is just a regular javascript object var foo = {}; <--- do you know what this means? – zerkms Aug 17 '12 at 2:08

I think you're trying to dynamically set the variable name in a literal. In JavaScript, you can do this like so objectname["variablename"] = value

There are actually two things you can do here:

  1. The literal that you are passing to the first argument of animate() can be pulled out
  2. The jQuery evaluation of $container can be pulled out, done once, and reused to speed things up.

Though some might call 2 an example of premature optimization, I think it makes your code more readable, anyway.

function show($div, $change, $value){

    var $container = "#" + $div;
    var $class = $div + "-" + "hidden";

    //alert($class + $container + $change + $value);

    var animation = {}; //declare a literal
    animation[$change] = $value; //create a name-value pair based on args

    var jqContainer = $($container);  //extract multiple jQuery evaluations
    jqContainer.addClass($class);
    jqContainer.animate(animation, 1000, function(){
            jqContainer.removeClass($class);
        } 
    );
}
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